Morning Brief, Thursday, October 4

Asia Pool/Getty Images North and South Korea announced their intention to improve economic ties and formally end the Korean War, but analysts and South Koreans seem underwhelmed (especially when South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun was caught picking his nose on camera). The White House issued no statement on the matter, though President Bush did cite ...

598872_071004_korea_05.jpg
598872_071004_korea_05.jpg

Asia

Pool/Getty Images

North and South Korea announced their intention to improve economic ties and formally end the Korean War, but analysts and South Koreans seem underwhelmed (especially when South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun was caught picking his nose on camera). The White House issued no statement on the matter, though President Bush did cite his administration's diplomatic approach to North Korea's nuclear program as a "case study" for Iran. The New York Times editorial page loves it.

Asia

Pool/Getty Images

North and South Korea announced their intention to improve economic ties and formally end the Korean War, but analysts and South Koreans seem underwhelmed (especially when South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun was caught picking his nose on camera). The White House issued no statement on the matter, though President Bush did cite his administration’s diplomatic approach to North Korea’s nuclear program as a “case study” for Iran. The New York Times editorial page loves it.

Burmese junta to international community: Screw you.

Former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto now says she’s “optimistic” that a power-sharing arrangement can be worked out with Pervez Musharraf. No word yet on whether Bhutto has opened a Twitter account to keep us all informed of her every move.

Middle East

The U.S. military caught an Iraqi member of parliament at an alleged al Qaeda gathering; his party’s spokesman says it was a funeral.

The government of Iraq is buying weapons from China.

The great hope of the moribund Syrian economy: Iran

Europe

French President Nicholas Sarkozy is meeting with Czech and Polish leaders before visiting Russia, a visit sure to “raise eyebrows in Moscow,” according to the International Herald Tribune.

French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner called for European countries to consider sanctions on Iran outside of the U.N. Security Council process.

Turkey’s new president defended his country’s human rights record at the Council of Europe meeting in Strasbourg, France.

Elsewhere

Some 1,250 South African gold miners remained trapped a mile underground after an accident knocked out the mine’s main elevator.

More revelations are coming out about the Gonzales Justice Department’s embrace of, shall we say, harsh interrogation techniques.

The Financial Times warns of a “subprime traffic jam” as U.S. mortgage companies struggle with requests from homebuyers looking to avoid defaulting on their loans. 

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