Morning Brief, Friday, October 5

RAVEENDRAN/AFP/Getty Images Asia Burma’s secretive junta announced that it has about 1,400 people in custody following the crackdown on protesters last week. They also declared willingness to meet with Aung San Suu Kyi, who’s been under house arrest for years, but only if she drops her “confrontational” attitude.  Pakistan’s election will go ahead tomorrow, but ...

598824_MonkAung5.jpg
598824_MonkAung5.jpg

RAVEENDRAN/AFP/Getty Images

Asia

Burma's secretive junta announced that it has about 1,400 people in custody following the crackdown on protesters last week. They also declared willingness to meet with Aung San Suu Kyi, who's been under house arrest for years, but only if she drops her "confrontational" attitude. 

RAVEENDRAN/AFP/Getty Images

Asia

Burma’s secretive junta announced that it has about 1,400 people in custody following the crackdown on protesters last week. They also declared willingness to meet with Aung San Suu Kyi, who’s been under house arrest for years, but only if she drops her “confrontational” attitude. 

Pakistan’s election will go ahead tomorrow, but Musharraf’s bid may be in jeopardy

And in China, who will succeed Hu Jintao?

Despite being the head of a country that bans surfing the Web, Kim Jong Il has declared himself an “Internet expert.”

Middle East

Iraqi officials allied with the US are still No.1 targets in Iraq. After the Hunt Oil deal last month, the Kurdish regional government inks four new deals with foreign firms for oil exploration.

Ahmadinejad stirs the pot in Tehran. 

The Saudis are going to overhaul their judicial system

Washington

House passes a bill to bring US contractors working in Iraq under US criminal law. 

Thursday’s report in the NYT about secret U.S. endorsement for tough interrogations – let’s call it torture – predictably got lawmakers all riled up.

Bob Zoellick shuffles the top leadership at the World Bank. 

The Economist weighs in on the prospect of Bush-Clinton-Bush-Clinton.

Elsewhere

Microsoft wants your medical records, and Bill Gates explains why

Will Gordon Brown call a snap election

All 3,200 South African miners are rescued safely and the country’s national police chief has a warrant out for his arrest (for mob ties).

This Weekend’s Agenda

Yesterday on Passport

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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