Morning Brief, Tuesday, October 9

Asia PORNCHAI/AFP/Getty Images Burma’s ruling junta named a “Minister of Relations” to negotiate with opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Meanwhile, a Burmese diplomat has resigned in protest of the attacks on Buddhist monks. North Korea’s state newspaper hailed the anniversary of the country’s first nuclear test as a “great miracle“. Domestic factions warring over ...

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598768_071009_kyi_05.jpg

Asia

PORNCHAI/AFP/Getty Images

Burma's ruling junta named a "Minister of Relations" to negotiate with opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Meanwhile, a Burmese diplomat has resigned in protest of the attacks on Buddhist monks.

Asia

PORNCHAI/AFP/Getty Images

Burma’s ruling junta named a “Minister of Relations” to negotiate with opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Meanwhile, a Burmese diplomat has resigned in protest of the attacks on Buddhist monks.

North Korea’s state newspaper hailed the anniversary of the country’s first nuclear test as a “great miracle“.

Domestic factions warring over India’s controversial nuclear deal with the United States agreed to meet to resolve their differences.

Asia is making great progress on poverty, but is lagging on addressing hunger, a new Asian Development Bank report says.

Middle East 

Students at Tehran University in Iran protested against Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, calling the Iranian president a “dictator” and demanding freedom of speech.

The U.S. State Department condemned the latest attacks by Kurdish militants against Turkish soldiers and civilians.

The government of Iraq is demanding that the U.S. State Department stop using Blackwater.

A few top Iraqi leaders say that national reconciliation should be abandoned as a goal.

Europe

U.S. Sen. Richard Lugar is urging President Bush to cooperate with Russia on an array of security issues before leaving office.

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown decided not to call elections and announced a plan to draw British troops down to 2,500 by next spring.

A panel of British MPs finds the EU treaty “substantially equivalent” to the EU constitution that was rejected by Dutch and French voters two years ago. 

The Nobel Prize in physics has gone to a French-German team for its work related to computer disk drives.

Elsewhere 

Discovery and development costs for oil and gas have tripled in the last decade.

The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is “already above the threshold that could potentially cause dangerous climate change,” a top Australian scientist warns.

The war over anti-malaria bed nets continues.

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