On newsstands now: FP’s hot, new November/December issue

Just in time for those Halloween goodie bags, the November/December issue of Foreign Policy is on newsstands now. Considering the cover shot of a menacing George W. Bush, you might assume FP is taking a shot at the U.S. president for his failed Iraq policy. You’d be mistaken—the blame for Iraq’s failure and the broader ...

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598170_cover-163med2.jpg

Just in time for those Halloween goodie bags, the November/December issue of Foreign Policy is on newsstands now. Considering the cover shot of a menacing George W. Bush, you might assume FP is taking a shot at the U.S. president for his failed Iraq policy. You'd be mistaken—the blame for Iraq's failure and the broader war on terrorism actually lies with the American people.

Just in time for those Halloween goodie bags, the November/December issue of Foreign Policy is on newsstands now. Considering the cover shot of a menacing George W. Bush, you might assume FP is taking a shot at the U.S. president for his failed Iraq policy. You’d be mistaken—the blame for Iraq’s failure and the broader war on terrorism actually lies with the American people.

Or so argues Alasdair Roberts. Roberts, a professor at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, writes in his provocative cover essay, “The War We Deserve,” that “The American public at large is more deeply implicated in the design and execution of the war on terror than it is comfortable to admit.” Over the past six years, Roberts complains, “Americans have remained largely unshaken in the commitment to a political philosophy that demands much from its government but asks little of its citizens.”

Also in this issue: Pace Nas, hip-hop is not dead. In fact, it’s alive and well in places everywhere from Ghana to Shanghai and has emerged as a powerful form of global communication, Jeff Chang writes. And if globalization is your thing, check out the seventh FP/A.T. Kearney Globalization Index, where you can find out why many analysts are worried that the ties that bind today’s “flat world” may be increasingly fragile. (To say nothing of the meth epidemic sweeping the globe.)

Elsewhere, FP editor in chief Moisés Naím takes a look at what will happen when activism meets communism at next summer’s Beijing Olympics; the Economist‘s Vijay V. Vaitheeswaran challenges conventional thinking on oil; Brian Winter of USA Today details the forces behind the meteoric rise of Mexico’s mysterious Carlos Slim; and FP explains how other billionaires around the world strike it rich thanks to globalization. [It was tempting to title that last piece “I Am a Billionaire (And So Can You!),” but we thought better of the idea. -Ed.] To read most of these fine articles, you’ll need to be a subscriber to FP. At just $25 bucks for two years of award-winning content, what are you waiting for? Subscribe now.

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