War on drugs working?

Chris Kraul of the Los Angeles Times reports from Bogotá, Colombia, on the U.S. war on drugs: Interruptions of the flow of cocaine to the United States are causing street prices to rise, a sign that the "war on drugs" is working, the White House anti-drug chief said here Thursday. John P. Walters, director of ...

Chris Kraul of the Los Angeles Times reports from Bogotá, Colombia, on the U.S. war on drugs:

Chris Kraul of the Los Angeles Times reports from Bogotá, Colombia, on the U.S. war on drugs:

Interruptions of the flow of cocaine to the United States are causing street prices to rise, a sign that the "war on drugs" is working, the White House anti-drug chief said here Thursday.

John P. Walters, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, told reporters that interdictions in Colombia, in other countries along cocaine transit routes and on the open seas were reducing drug supplies, according to data on price and purity gathered in 37 major U.S. cities.

As a result of reduced supply, street cocaine prices over the first nine months of the year rose to an average $136.93 per pure gram at the end of September, a 44% increase from January, he said. Price and purity data were supported by other measures, including reduced evidence of cocaine use as found in workplace tests, he said.

Kraul pours a heaping does of skepticism on the ONDCP's claims, unusual for a reported news story. But for some seriously heated debate on the drug war, you should watch FPTV's recent segment on Think Again: Drugs featuring David Murray, chief scientist at the ONDCP, and Ethan Nadelmann of the Drug Policy Alliance, an advocacy group that is highly critical of U.S. policies in this arena. Check it out—it's must-see TV.

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