Morning Brief, Tuesday, November 20

Middle East CHRIS HONDROS/Getty Images Baghdad residents are feeling safer, the New York Times reports. More and more, U.S. commanders say, insurgents are fighting for cash, not ideology. Lebanon’s presidential election? Delayed again until Nov. 23. Iran’s foreign minister says his country will hold new talks with the United States on Iraq.  Israel is seeking ...

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BAGHDAD, IRAQ - NOVEMBER 18: Lt. Timothy Gross of the 2-12 Infantry (R) gives a playful high-handshake to one of the leaders of the American-backed Iraqi Security Volunteers, an armed Sunni group, at the ISV headquarters November 18, 2007 in the Dora neighborhood of Baghdad, Iraq. Dora, a Sunni enclave and once one of Baghdad's most violent neighborhoods for US troops, has been calm recently, freeing US troops to work on civil policing, such as domestic violence and petty crime. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

Middle East

CHRIS HONDROS/Getty Images

Baghdad residents are feeling safer, the New York Times reports. More and more, U.S. commanders say, insurgents are fighting for cash, not ideology.

Middle East

CHRIS HONDROS/Getty Images

Baghdad residents are feeling safer, the New York Times reports. More and more, U.S. commanders say, insurgents are fighting for cash, not ideology.

Lebanon’s presidential election? Delayed again until Nov. 23.

Iran’s foreign minister says his country will hold new talks with the United States on Iraq. 

Israel is seeking the help of Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak in bringing other Arab countries on board for the upcoming Annapolis talks. 

Asia

The government of Pakistan says it released about 3,400 prisoners who had been imprisoned as a result of the state of emergency.

China’s prime minister expressed his country’s growing concern over the decline of the U.S. dollar. 

Bangladesh’s military and relief teams are still unable to reach some 30 percent of areas devastated by Cyclone Sidr.

Europe 

Civil servants have joined transport and energy workers on strike in France. 

Europe’s farmers may be getting their subsidies cut.

Russian President Vladimir Putin condemned NATO’s “muscle-flexing” and said that his country must be ready to deal a “swift and adequate response” to any aggression.

Elsewhere 

The United Nations says that only 33 million people have HIV, 7 million less than previously estimated.

A special U.N. internal investigative unit needs more time to investigate all the allegations of corruption it has received.

U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon doesn’t think a U.N. peacekeeping force for Somalia is a good idea. But U.N. officials who work on Somalia are clamoring to bring attention to Somalia’s worsening plight.

A new World Bank study finds that more than a third of countries have lowered the tax burden on businesses over the last three years.

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