Morning Brief, Tuesday, November 27

Middle East Getty Images The Annapolis Conference begins today amid diminished expectations from observers and “restrained optimism” from the White House. Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister said he only agreed to participate because the Bush administration promised to wrap up negotiations within a year. Back in Gaza, hardliners condemned the peace talks.  The governments of Iraq ...

597988_071127_bush_05.jpg
597988_071127_bush_05.jpg

Middle East

Getty Images

The Annapolis Conference begins today amid diminished expectations from observers and "restrained optimism" from the White House. Saudi Arabia's foreign minister said he only agreed to participate because the Bush administration promised to wrap up negotiations within a year. Back in Gaza, hardliners condemned the peace talks

Middle East





Getty Images

The Annapolis Conference begins today amid diminished expectations from observers and “restrained optimism” from the White House. Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister said he only agreed to participate because the Bush administration promised to wrap up negotiations within a year. Back in Gaza, hardliners condemned the peace talks

The governments of Iraq and the United States agreed to negotiate a long-term security arrangement. Text of the joint declaration here.

Iran has a new missile with a claimed range of 1,250 miles. 

Abu Dhabi is set to buy $7.5 billion worth of shares in Citigroup. 

Asia

In Beijing, French President Nicolas Sarkozy warned that China could face carbon taxes on its exports to Europe.

Chinese officials said the Three Gorges Dam has nothing to do with all of those pesky geological and environmental problems. 

Pakistani President and Army Chief of Staff Pervez Musharraf bade his troops adieu Tuesday in Rawalpindi and promised to step down from his military post on Thursday. Meanwhile, the Army claims it is making progress against pro-Taliban militants in the tribal area of Swat.

Europe

Youth violence is spreading in the suburbs of Paris. 

Iceland tops the U.N.’s Human Development Index, surpassing Norway. (The United States slipped four places to rank 12th in this year’s Index.)

In a booming Russia, Soviet-style nostalgia wear is the epitome of chic.

Elsewhere

Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore visited the White House yesterday and met President Bush privately for the first time since December 2000.

Hugo Chávez is building a “socialist city” in the mountains of Venezuela. 

Consulting firm Deloitte announced its 2007 list of the fastest-growing companies in North America, with Sirius satellite radio taking the top spot.

Today’s Agenda

Yesterday on Passport

Web Exclusive

  • The FP Debate: Should the U.S. Abandon Pervez Musharraf?
    Is it time to send Pervez Musharraf packing? Two top experts on South Asia, Daniel Markey of the Council on Foreign Relations and Husain Haqqani of Boston University, square off on the tottering Pakistani president’s fate.

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.