Literary brothers-in-arms

Suhaila Sahmarani/AFP/Getty Images Stephen Chernin/Getty Images Reading through John Bolton’s newly released book, Surrender is Not an Option , I had a distinct sense of déjà vu. Bolton’s chip-on-the-shoulder account of his tenure as U.N. ambassador seemed very familiar. Then it hit me. In tone and tenor, Bolton’s book is a dead ringer for Boutros ...

By , a professor at Indiana University’s Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies.
597559_boutrosboutrosghali_05.jpg
597559_boutrosboutrosghali_05.jpg

Suhaila Sahmarani/AFP/Getty Images

Stephen Chernin/Getty Images
Reading through John Bolton's newly released book,
Surrender is Not an Option
, I had a distinct sense of déjà vu. Bolton's chip-on-the-shoulder account of his tenure as U.N. ambassador seemed very familiar. Then it hit me. In tone and tenor, Bolton's book is a dead ringer for Boutros Boutros-Ghali's
Unvanquished
. In that book, the former secretary-general bitterly attacked the United States (and Madeleine Albright, in particular) for ending his tenure as secretary-general. Both men methodically—almost obsessively—document the slights they received and the ripostes they offered. They have written rebuttals, not memoirs. By most accounts, Boutros-Ghali and Bolton are driven, highly intelligent, and committed. But both men left the East River in the mood for revenge rather than reflection.    

Suhaila Sahmarani/AFP/Getty Images

Stephen Chernin/Getty Images

Reading through John Bolton’s newly released book,
Surrender is Not an Option
, I had a distinct sense of déjà vu. Bolton’s chip-on-the-shoulder account of his tenure as U.N. ambassador seemed very familiar. Then it hit me. In tone and tenor, Bolton’s book is a dead ringer for Boutros Boutros-Ghali’s
Unvanquished
. In that book, the former secretary-general bitterly attacked the United States (and Madeleine Albright, in particular) for ending his tenure as secretary-general. Both men methodically—almost obsessively—document the slights they received and the ripostes they offered. They have written rebuttals, not memoirs. By most accounts, Boutros-Ghali and Bolton are driven, highly intelligent, and committed. But both men left the East River in the mood for revenge rather than reflection.    

David Bosco is a professor at Indiana University’s Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies. He is the author of The Poseidon Project: The Struggle to Govern the World’s Oceans. Twitter: @multilateralist

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