Passport

A good year for FP

As 2007 draws to a close, FP thanks all of you—our readers—for making the year a successful one. We hope you've enjoyed the provocative, and sometimes contrarian, pieces in our print magazine, as well as the mix of serious and lighthearted posts on our blog, Passport. FP's commitment to challenging the conventional wisdom was recognized ...

As 2007 draws to a close, FP thanks all of you—our readers—for making the year a successful one. We hope you've enjoyed the provocative, and sometimes contrarian, pieces in our print magazine, as well as the mix of serious and lighthearted posts on our blog, Passport.

FP's commitment to challenging the conventional wisdom was recognized this week through a 2007 Utne Independent Press Award in the category of international coverage. The editors of Utne Reader said the following about FP:

If psychologists tried to analyze Foreign Policy, they'd probably diagnose the bimonthly with an acute case of Oppositional Defiant Disorder. Whatever the rest of the world currently believes about global politics, Foreign Policy will find someone who disagrees. And, much to the consternation of political candidates and world leaders, the contrarian views espoused are often dead on.

As 2007 draws to a close, FP thanks all of you—our readers—for making the year a successful one. We hope you've enjoyed the provocative, and sometimes contrarian, pieces in our print magazine, as well as the mix of serious and lighthearted posts on our blog, Passport.

FP's commitment to challenging the conventional wisdom was recognized this week through a 2007 Utne Independent Press Award in the category of international coverage. The editors of Utne Reader said the following about FP:

If psychologists tried to analyze Foreign Policy, they'd probably diagnose the bimonthly with an acute case of Oppositional Defiant Disorder. Whatever the rest of the world currently believes about global politics, Foreign Policy will find someone who disagrees. And, much to the consternation of political candidates and world leaders, the contrarian views espoused are often dead on.

This award is one of several this year that FP feels honored to have received. In May, Foreign Policy won a prestigious National Magazine Award—the "Oscars" of the magazine world—for "general excellence" in its "weight class" (magazines with circulations between 100,000 and 250,000). Other honors this year include:

If you're not yet a subscriber of our print magazine, we encourage you to sign up to receive it in the mail. It's just $24.95 for two years. Better yet, if you're looking for a last-minute holiday gift, give your friend or family member a subscription and you'll get a one-year subscription for free (current subscribers will have their subscriptions renewed for free).

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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