What We’re Reading

Preeti Aroon “‘Wombs for rent’ grows in India,” by Sunita Thakur for Marketplace. Just about everything seems to get outsourced to India these days. You can even pay up to $10,000 to rent a poor Indian woman’s womb and get the baby you’ve always wanted but couldn’t carry yourself. Some say the practice gives destitute ...

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Preeti Aroon

"'Wombs for rent' grows in India," by Sunita Thakur for Marketplace. Just about everything seems to get outsourced to India these days. You can even pay up to $10,000 to rent a poor Indian woman's womb and get the baby you've always wanted but couldn't carry yourself. Some say the practice gives destitute women opportunity; others say it's exploitation. The debate continues on a New York Times blog.

Mike Boyer

Preeti Aroon

  • ‘Wombs for rent’ grows in India,” by Sunita Thakur for Marketplace. Just about everything seems to get outsourced to India these days. You can even pay up to $10,000 to rent a poor Indian woman’s womb and get the baby you’ve always wanted but couldn’t carry yourself. Some say the practice gives destitute women opportunity; others say it’s exploitation. The debate continues on a New York Times blog.

Mike Boyer

JAVIER SORIANO/AFP/Getty

David Francis

Blake Hounshell

  • They Knew They Were Right: The Rise of the Neocons, by Jacob Heilbrunn. As you might guess from the title, this is hardly a sympathetic portrait of the “neoconservative” movement. But with Weekly Standard favorite John McCain on on the upswing in New Hampshire, Heilbrunn’s prediction that the “neocons” will rise again is looking prescient.

Adam Lewis

  • China Offers Unproven Medical Treatments,” by Christoper Bodeen and Alan Scher Zagier in the Washington Post. While presidential candidates debate the arcana of healthcare policy, Americans are taking advantage of the newest trend in outsourcing: medicine. Chinese hospitals are willing to perform little-tested and potentially lethal procedures using stem cell transplants to aid those suffering from debilitating diseases and disorders. But at what cost?

Prerna Mankad

Kate Palmer

  • Climate Debate Daily, a new aggregator from the people who brought you Arts and Letters Daily. With so much spin, hyperbole, and misinformation about global warming and climate change, this is a great new source for all the major arguments being made on all sides of this important debate.

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