When the president’s daughter goes wild online

ALEJANDRO PAGNI/AFP/Getty Images Nestor Kirchner may be the former president of Argentina, but there’s one person who has refused to obey his ex-presidential orders: his 17-year-old daughter Florencia. Daddy isn’t happy that his adolescent daughter, whose mother is current Argentine President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, has been posting wild-child photos on her blog. He is reported to ...

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597218_kirchner_05.jpg

ALEJANDRO PAGNI/AFP/Getty Images

Nestor Kirchner may be the former president of Argentina, but there's one person who has refused to obey his ex-presidential orders: his 17-year-old daughter Florencia.

Daddy isn't happy that his adolescent daughter, whose mother is current Argentine President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, has been posting wild-child photos on her blog. He is reported to have begged her to stop posting images. Like any smart teenager, though, Florencia simply changes her screen name. She has gone from "bananarepublic" to "coffelove" to her present "florkey."

ALEJANDRO PAGNI/AFP/Getty Images

Nestor Kirchner may be the former president of Argentina, but there’s one person who has refused to obey his ex-presidential orders: his 17-year-old daughter Florencia.

Daddy isn’t happy that his adolescent daughter, whose mother is current Argentine President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, has been posting wild-child photos on her blog. He is reported to have begged her to stop posting images. Like any smart teenager, though, Florencia simply changes her screen name. She has gone from “bananarepublic” to “coffelove” to her present “florkey.”

Some photos are innocuous and reveal rare glimpses of the first family’s life, such as a photo of Florencia backstage with her brother and two cousins at her mother’s inauguration last year. Others, though, have alarmed some in the Argentine press, because they show her wandering around Buenos Aires with no security detail in sight (e.g. a photo of Florencia on the subway with a friend).

At least her parents may be happy to know that when she interviewed herself online, she said her favorite country was, “Argentina, I think.”

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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