Gaza ready to explode

MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images In the wake of U.S. President George W. Bush’s visit, it appears that more violence, rather than the hoped-for peace, is breaking out in the Palestinian territories. Israeli Defense Minister and Labor Party leader Ehud Barak has promised to step up the assault on Gaza militants who have been attacking southern Israel ...

597034_gaza_0_15.jpg
597034_gaza_0_15.jpg

MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images

In the wake of U.S. President George W. Bush's visit, it appears that more violence, rather than the hoped-for peace, is breaking out in the Palestinian territories. Israeli Defense Minister and Labor Party leader Ehud Barak has promised to step up the assault on Gaza militants who have been attacking southern Israel with Qassam rockets:

Even as we stand here, Qassam fire continues. The [Israel Defense Force (IDF)] will continue in its ongoing operation and deepen it in order to strike at the perpetrators, until the firing stops… It won't be easy, it won't happen this weekend, but we will bring an end to Qassam attacks on Sderot."

MAHMUD HAMS/AFP/Getty Images

In the wake of U.S. President George W. Bush’s visit, it appears that more violence, rather than the hoped-for peace, is breaking out in the Palestinian territories. Israeli Defense Minister and Labor Party leader Ehud Barak has promised to step up the assault on Gaza militants who have been attacking southern Israel with Qassam rockets:

Even as we stand here, Qassam fire continues. The [Israel Defense Force (IDF)] will continue in its ongoing operation and deepen it in order to strike at the perpetrators, until the firing stops… It won’t be easy, it won’t happen this weekend, but we will bring an end to Qassam attacks on Sderot.”

To add to the chorus, Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni had this to say:

The answer to the Qassam rocket attacks is an uncompromising war on terror which originates from Gaza, and not only through dialogue and negotiations. [Israel] must be clear: when speaking of a Palestinian state, we are talking about two parts—Gaza and the West Bank.”

The Hamas government in Gaza has reportedly agreed to try and stop the rocket fire, but tellingly warned that it would be difficult to do so if Israeli military assaults continue. 

Honestly though, how can anyone ask people on either side to negotiate for peace while bombs are falling on their civilians? It sounds like the roadmap needs a detour: Get Gaza under control, then talk about what comes next.

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