Kenyan riots trap Obama’s uncle

The uncle of Democratic presidential hopeful Barack Obama has gotten caught up in Kenya’s latest spasm of unrest: KISUMU, Kenya (AP) — U.S. presidential hopeful Barack Obama’s uncle has been a prisoner in his own home, trapped by postelection violence that has left more than 600 Kenyans dead. Said Obama lives in this western city, ...

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597026_kenya1_08.jpg
NAIROBI, KENYA - JANUARY 17: (ISRAEL OUT) A Kenyan man demonstrates in the Kibera slums on January 17, 2008 in Nairobi, Kenya. International mediators have attempted to unlock political gridlock in the East African nation which has lost 600 people in severe post-election violence amid allegations that the incumbent president manipulated the December elections. (Photo by Uriel Sinai/Getty Images)

The uncle of Democratic presidential hopeful Barack Obama has gotten caught up in Kenya's latest spasm of unrest:

KISUMU, Kenya (AP) — U.S. presidential hopeful Barack Obama's uncle has been a prisoner in his own home, trapped by postelection violence that has left more than 600 Kenyans dead.

Said Obama lives in this western city, near a slum that has been a flashpoint for violence. Police shot and killed four people here Wednesday while trying to prevent thousands of rowdy protesters from entering the city center.

The uncle of Democratic presidential hopeful Barack Obama has gotten caught up in Kenya’s latest spasm of unrest:

KISUMU, Kenya (AP) — U.S. presidential hopeful Barack Obama’s uncle has been a prisoner in his own home, trapped by postelection violence that has left more than 600 Kenyans dead.

Said Obama lives in this western city, near a slum that has been a flashpoint for violence. Police shot and killed four people here Wednesday while trying to prevent thousands of rowdy protesters from entering the city center.

“Yesterday I was confined to my house, it was just too dangerous to go out,” Said Obama said. “I could hear bullets around the place so I stayed put and listened to the radio for news.”

Clashes between rioters and police continued in Kisumu Thursday, though the New York Times reports that the worst ethnic violence has passed and the Washington Post says that the protests on both Wednesday and Thursday have been relatively small. Are opposition supporters giving up?

(Photos: Uriel Sinai/Getty Images)

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