This time, he’s fighting…the Burmese junta

ROSLAN RAHMAN/Getty Images Here in the United States, the recently released Rambo hasn’t gotten the best reviews; it scored a lowly 35 on Rotten Tomatoes’s tomatometer. But among Burmese nationals, it’s a huge hit—and inspirational, to boot. Yesterday, a Rambo screening in Singapore, organized by the Overseas Burmese Patriots Group and packed with Burmese expats, ...

596695_Rambo_05.jpg
596695_Rambo_05.jpg

ROSLAN RAHMAN/Getty Images

Here in the United States, the recently released Rambo hasn't gotten the best reviews; it scored a lowly 35 on Rotten Tomatoes's tomatometer. But among Burmese nationals, it's a huge hit—and inspirational, to boot. Yesterday, a Rambo screening in Singapore, organized by the Overseas Burmese Patriots Group and packed with Burmese expats, sold out all 600 tickets.

In the movie, everyone's favorite former Green Beret, John Rambo, takes on Burma's military junta in an effort to rescue Christian missionaries who have been taken captive. Burmese moviegoers at yesterday's screening broke out in loud cheers and applause at the movie's climax when Sly Stallone saves the missionaries and slays their captors. "Just like Rambo is in the movie, Burma is waiting for a hero or someone to lead the revolution," one audience member told AFP.

ROSLAN RAHMAN/Getty Images

Here in the United States, the recently released Rambo hasn’t gotten the best reviews; it scored a lowly 35 on Rotten Tomatoes’s tomatometer. But among Burmese nationals, it’s a huge hit—and inspirational, to boot. Yesterday, a Rambo screening in Singapore, organized by the Overseas Burmese Patriots Group and packed with Burmese expats, sold out all 600 tickets.

In the movie, everyone’s favorite former Green Beret, John Rambo, takes on Burma’s military junta in an effort to rescue Christian missionaries who have been taken captive. Burmese moviegoers at yesterday’s screening broke out in loud cheers and applause at the movie’s climax when Sly Stallone saves the missionaries and slays their captors. “Just like Rambo is in the movie, Burma is waiting for a hero or someone to lead the revolution,” one audience member told AFP.

The junta has banned the film from being shown in Burma, but that hasn’t stopped pirated DVDs from flooding Rangoon. “People are going crazy with the quote ‘Live for nothing, die for something’,” one Burmese told Reuters, in reference to one of Rambo’s gems of wisdom from the film.

Meanwhile, Stallone says he is willing to go personally to Burma to confront junta officials. He has even offered to debate them in front of the U.S. Congress. And I think we’d all love to see that happen. 

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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