Kosovo counts its friends

Before declaring independence, Kosovo’s Prime Minister Hashim Thaci announced that 100 countries would quickly recognize its sovereign status. It seems he may have been a bit too optimistic. Currently, 25 countries have or are in the process of recognizing the Republic of Kosova (Kosova being the preferred Albanian spelling). According to the website kosovothanksyou.com, a ...

596234_world_large2.gif
596234_world_large2.gif

Before declaring independence, Kosovo's Prime Minister Hashim Thaci announced that 100 countries would quickly recognize its sovereign status. It seems he may have been a bit too optimistic.

Before declaring independence, Kosovo’s Prime Minister Hashim Thaci announced that 100 countries would quickly recognize its sovereign status. It seems he may have been a bit too optimistic.

Currently, 25 countries have or are in the process of recognizing the Republic of Kosova (Kosova being the preferred Albanian spelling). According to the website kosovothanksyou.com, a site created by two Kosovar Albanians to thank recognizing countries, another 28 countries are expected to eventually recognize Kosovo’s sovereignty. But that still leaves Thaci short of his hopeful 100. The site includes a handy map showing recognizing countries in blue and potential recognizing countries in yellow:

The list of recognizing countries includes big names like the United States, France, Britain, and 12 others from the EU. But the list falls short on regional players — Romania and Bosnia have both said they will not recognize Kosovo — and on emerging global powers like Russia, China, and India. Predominantly Muslim Senegal is the only recognizing country in Africa, and recognition for Europe’s new majority-Muslim state has been slow in the rest of the Islamic world too. Turkey and Afghanistan are the only other Islamic countries to have recognized Kosovo so far.

Even if Kosovo does hit the 100 country mark, that’s still barely half the countries in the world. Though, I suppose fewer recognizing countries does mean fewer thank you notes.

Lucy Moore is a researcher at Foreign Policy.

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows the Statue of Liberty holding a torch with other hands alongside hers as she lifts the flame, also resembling laurel, into place on the edge of the United Nations laurel logo.
An illustration shows the Statue of Liberty holding a torch with other hands alongside hers as she lifts the flame, also resembling laurel, into place on the edge of the United Nations laurel logo.

A New Multilateralism

How the United States can rejuvenate the global institutions it created.

A view from the cockpit shows backlit control panels and two pilots inside a KC-130J aerial refueler en route from Williamtown to Darwin as the sun sets on the horizon.
A view from the cockpit shows backlit control panels and two pilots inside a KC-130J aerial refueler en route from Williamtown to Darwin as the sun sets on the horizon.

America Prepares for a Pacific War With China It Doesn’t Want

Embedded with U.S. forces in the Pacific, I saw the dilemmas of deterrence firsthand.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, seen in a suit and tie and in profile, walks outside the venue at the Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation. Behind him is a sculptural tree in a larger planter that appears to be leaning away from him.
Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, seen in a suit and tie and in profile, walks outside the venue at the Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation. Behind him is a sculptural tree in a larger planter that appears to be leaning away from him.

The Endless Frustration of Chinese Diplomacy

Beijing’s representatives are always scared they could be the next to vanish.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan welcomes Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia Mohammed bin Salman during an official ceremony at the Presidential Complex in Ankara, on June 22, 2022.
Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan welcomes Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia Mohammed bin Salman during an official ceremony at the Presidential Complex in Ankara, on June 22, 2022.

The End of America’s Middle East

The region’s four major countries have all forfeited Washington’s trust.