Turkey withdraws from Iraq

MUSTAFA OZER/AFP/Getty Images Turkey has withdrawn its troops from Iraq today according to a statement from the army’s General Staff: “It was determined that the aims set at the start of the operation had been achieved,” the General Staff said in a statement. “Our units returned to their bases (in Turkey) on the morning of ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
596209_turkish_soldiers_800620592.jpg
596209_turkish_soldiers_800620592.jpg

MUSTAFA OZER/AFP/Getty Images

Turkey has withdrawn its troops from Iraq today according to a statement from the army's General Staff:

"It was determined that the aims set at the start of the operation had been achieved," the General Staff said in a statement. "Our units returned to their bases (in Turkey) on the morning of February 29."

MUSTAFA OZER/AFP/Getty Images

Turkey has withdrawn its troops from Iraq today according to a statement from the army’s General Staff:

“It was determined that the aims set at the start of the operation had been achieved,” the General Staff said in a statement. “Our units returned to their bases (in Turkey) on the morning of February 29.”

Turkey claims it killed 240 P.K.K. rebels during the eight day operation and suffered 27 casualties of its own. The P.K.K, meanwhile, says that it has killed 130 Turkish troops and is also claiming victory:

“Because of the fierce battles between the PKK and the Turkish forces, the Turkish forces have withdrawn,” said Ahmed Danees, the PKK’s foreign relations spokesman in northern Iraq.

It’s fairly clear that neither side scored a decisive blow and this conflict isn’t anywhere near to a resolution. Still, Turkey’s ground invasion didn’t lead to the region-wide catastrophe that many had feared. That, at least, is cause for relief.

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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