Morning Brief, Thursday, March 6

2008 U.S. Elections EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images Canada’s prime minister vowed to investigate the leak of a confidential memo on NAFTA that damaged the campaign of Barack Obama. The Illinois senator is taking a more combative approach after Tuesday’s losses. Victory aside, Hillary Clinton’s campaign advisors are still warring amongst themselves. Europe Russia is spending millions ...

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596120_080325_obama2.jpg

2008 U.S. Elections

EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images

Canada's prime minister vowed to investigate the leak of a confidential memo on NAFTA that damaged the campaign of Barack Obama.

2008 U.S. Elections

EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images

Canada’s prime minister vowed to investigate the leak of a confidential memo on NAFTA that damaged the campaign of Barack Obama.

The Illinois senator is taking a more combative approach after Tuesday’s losses.

Victory aside, Hillary Clinton’s campaign advisors are still warring amongst themselves.

Europe

Russia is spending millions of dollars on public diplomacy.

Europe’s central bank has a different approach than the U.S. Federal Reserve: price stability above all. The euro is at an all-time high against the dollar ahead of an upcoming ECB meeting.

European NATO members are said to be skeptical of admitting Ukraine, Georgia, Croatia, Macedonia, and Albania to the alliance. Croatia has the best shot.

Middle East

Meet Iran’s central banker. His country is an economic basket case.

In the West Bank, more barriers to movement have gone up since Annapolis than have been taken down. Several British aid groups say the humanitarian situation in Gaza is at its worst point since 1967.

Centcom commander William J. Fallon says he’s not the Iran dove some have made him out to be.

Asia

Human Rights Watch accuses the Sri Lankan government of “disappearing” hundreds of people.

Malaysia’s elections, slated for Mar. 8, may be exacerbating ethnic tensions.

China says the U.S. military is exaggerating the Chinese threat.

Chinese diplomats are trying to get the six-party talks with North Korea back on track.

Elsewhere

A small bomb struck a U.S. military recruiting center in Times Square, New York.

The U.S. Department of Justice is building a massive national intelligence database with records culled from thousands of local authorities.

Warren Buffet has overtaken Bill Gates and Carlos Slim to become the world’s richest man, according to Forbes.

Colombia sees no risk of war with Ecuador or Venezuela. It appears, though, that Colombia is diplomatically isolated in the region.

Today’s Agenda

  • The United Nations is hosting a discussion of ways to get the peacekeeping mission in Darfur up and running.
  • Today is World Book Day.
  • It’s the fifth anniversary of the much-maligned Department of Homeland Security.
  • NATO foreign ministers are meeting in Brussels to discuss possible new members.

Yesterday on Passport

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