Morning Brief, Monday, March 10

2008 U.S. Elections EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images Barack Obama won a big victory in the Wyoming caucuses Satuday, netting himself two delegates. Next up? Mississippi, where the Illinois senator is also favored. The Clintons are calling for a Hillary/Barack unity ticket. Remember the sleeping girl in that “3. a.m. phone call” ad? In real life, she ...

596076_080310_obama3.jpg
596076_080310_obama3.jpg

2008 U.S. Elections

EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images

Barack Obama won a big victory in the Wyoming caucuses Satuday, netting himself two delegates. Next up? Mississippi, where the Illinois senator is also favored.

2008 U.S. Elections

EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images

Barack Obama won a big victory in the Wyoming caucuses Satuday, netting himself two delegates. Next up? Mississippi, where the Illinois senator is also favored.

The Clintons are calling for a Hillary/Barack unity ticket.

Remember the sleeping girl in that “3. a.m. phone call” ad? In real life, she backs Obama.

The New York Times asks questions: Is Hillary Clinton a bad manager? Is Barack Obama an inconsequential senator? Is John McCain a bad fundraiser?

Europe

Spanish PM José Luis Rodriguez Zapatero’s Social Party picked up five seats in Spain’s bitterly waged legislative elections but failed to win an outright majority.

As expected, France’s municipal elections were a setback for President Nicolas Sarkozy, whose prime minister vowed to continue his reform agenda.

Nationalist PM Vojislav Kostunica dissolved the Serbian government in a bid to boost anti-EU forces and capitalize on anger over Kosovo.

Italy’s top appeals court has ruled that women can lie to conceal adultery.

Asia

Pakistan’s two leading political parties are teaming up against President Pervez Musharraf.

Malaysia’s ruling coalition has taken a beating, as have the country’s markets.

Yao Ming says he’ll be ready to play in time for the Olympics.

Middle East

Gaza is relatively calm as the Egyptians negotiate a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas. Israel approved new construction in the West Bank.

A female suicide bomber killed a Sunni tribal leader in Diyala Province, Iraq.

If you live in Saudi Arabia and you get a message on your mobile phone from Ayman al-Zawihiri, please alert the authorities within a week.

Vice President Dick Cheney is headed to the Middle East next week.

Elsewhere

President George W. Bush vetoed a bill that would have banned waterboarding by the CIA.

U.S. demand for oil decreased slightly in February. The average pump price for gasoline has hit a record $3.20 per gallon.

Venezuela moved to restore diplomatic ties with Colombia.

New research suggests that carbon emissions must fall to near zero if we are to avoid dangerous global warming. That’s good news for carbon-emissions traders.

Today’s Agenda

  • Local elections are taking place in Batticaloa, Sri Lanka, an area recently taken from the Tamil Tiger rebels.
  • Indonesia’s president is visiting Iran.
  • President Bush is welcoming Polish PM Donald Tusk to the White House.
  • Queen Elizabeth of England is hosting Commonwealth Day celebrations in London.

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