Rice meets with Lebanese warlord

MARWAN NAAMANI/AFP/Getty Images Al Kamen reports that U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice is meeting with Lebanese Maronite leader Samir Geagea, a key player in the so-called March 14 forces that comprise the current, embattled govenment. Kamen’s item reminded me of the chill that went down my spine when I passed by Ehden, a town ...

595971_080314_geagea2.jpg
595971_080314_geagea2.jpg

MARWAN NAAMANI/AFP/Getty Images

Al Kamen reports that U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice is meeting with Lebanese Maronite leader Samir Geagea, a key player in the so-called March 14 forces that comprise the current, embattled govenment. Kamen's item reminded me of the chill that went down my spine when I passed by Ehden, a town in Lebanon's beautiful Qadisha Valley, back in 2005. Here's an excerpt from the Lonely Planet book on Lebanon & Syria:

In one of the most notorious events of the war, Samir Geagea of Bcharré amassed several hundred militiamen, went into the home of Tony Franjieh (son of President Suleiman Franjieh) in Ehden and proceeded to kill him and his entire family as they slept. While this was explained by political differences between the two families, in fact it had its roots in a feud between the Geageas and the Franjiehs, which dates back to the 19th century. At that time, according to local (Bcharré) lore, a Geagea woman was killed by two Ehden men after offering them water and food. In response Bcharré's residents burden down the town of Ehden and killed many of its inhabitants.

MARWAN NAAMANI/AFP/Getty Images

Al Kamen reports that U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice is meeting with Lebanese Maronite leader Samir Geagea, a key player in the so-called March 14 forces that comprise the current, embattled govenment. Kamen’s item reminded me of the chill that went down my spine when I passed by Ehden, a town in Lebanon’s beautiful Qadisha Valley, back in 2005. Here’s an excerpt from the Lonely Planet book on Lebanon & Syria:

In one of the most notorious events of the war, Samir Geagea of Bcharré amassed several hundred militiamen, went into the home of Tony Franjieh (son of President Suleiman Franjieh) in Ehden and proceeded to kill him and his entire family as they slept. While this was explained by political differences between the two families, in fact it had its roots in a feud between the Geageas and the Franjiehs, which dates back to the 19th century. At that time, according to local (Bcharré) lore, a Geagea woman was killed by two Ehden men after offering them water and food. In response Bcharré’s residents burden down the town of Ehden and killed many of its inhabitants.

Geagea maintains he was framed by the Syrians, but it seems fairly well established that he was at least involved, if not directly responsible for Franjieh’s death. It should also be noted that the Franjieh clan has plenty of blood on its hands, too. Such is Lebanon.

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