How to fight the next generation of terror

Chris Hondros/Getty Images Marc Sageman, author of “The Next Generation of Terror” in the current issue of FP, has been getting a great deal of praise for his provocative take on the newest wave of global jihadists. To Sageman, this next generation — lacking in any kind of formal leadership, united only through the Web, ...

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595816_080324_insurgent2.jpg

Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Marc Sageman, author of "The Next Generation of Terror" in the current issue of FP, has been getting a great deal of praise for his provocative take on the newest wave of global jihadists. To Sageman, this next generation -- lacking in any kind of formal leadership, united only through the Web, and motivated purely by vanity -- is even more dangerous than their forebears. Why? Precisely because they're more difficult to detect and don't answer to a single authority. They're volatile, self-recruited wannabes, and they're the future of terror. But, as Sageman explains, their movement is also vulnerable for these very reasons.

Now, it's your chance to ask Sageman questions about the next generation of jihadists. Send us questions by 5 p.m. this Tuesday, March 25, and we'll post Sageman's responses here on Monday, March 31.

Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Marc Sageman, author of “The Next Generation of Terror” in the current issue of FP, has been getting a great deal of praise for his provocative take on the newest wave of global jihadists. To Sageman, this next generation — lacking in any kind of formal leadership, united only through the Web, and motivated purely by vanity — is even more dangerous than their forebears. Why? Precisely because they’re more difficult to detect and don’t answer to a single authority. They’re volatile, self-recruited wannabes, and they’re the future of terror. But, as Sageman explains, their movement is also vulnerable for these very reasons.

Now, it’s your chance to ask Sageman questions about the next generation of jihadists. Send us questions by 5 p.m. this Tuesday, March 25, and we’ll post Sageman’s responses here on Monday, March 31.

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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