Tiny Uruguay hosts the world’s biggest barbecue

Marcelo Singer/AFP/Getty Images Uruguay and its 3.4 million people entered the big leagues of culinary feats Sunday by organizing the world’s largest barbecue. Snatching the title away from Mexico, Uruguay has triumphed — at least for now — in a global cookout war that has been raging for years. Namibia tried but failed in 2006 ...

595480_080414_uraguay2.jpg
595480_080414_uraguay2.jpg

Marcelo Singer/AFP/Getty Images

Uruguay and its 3.4 million people entered the big leagues of culinary feats Sunday by organizing the world's largest barbecue. Snatching the title away from Mexico, Uruguay has triumphed -- at least for now -- in a global cookout war that has been raging for years.

Namibia tried but failed in 2006 to beat Australia for the world's largest sausage. The Philippines set up the world's longest barbecue in 2003, though I believe Uruguay just showed them up by about half a kilometer.

Marcelo Singer/AFP/Getty Images

Uruguay and its 3.4 million people entered the big leagues of culinary feats Sunday by organizing the world’s largest barbecue. Snatching the title away from Mexico, Uruguay has triumphed — at least for now — in a global cookout war that has been raging for years.

Namibia tried but failed in 2006 to beat Australia for the world’s largest sausage. The Philippines set up the world’s longest barbecue in 2003, though I believe Uruguay just showed them up by about half a kilometer.

The small South American country pulled off the stunt to highlight its beef exports (at least $800 million worth in 2007). To give you an idea of the size and scope of the operation, army personnel set up the grills, firefighters lit 6 tons of charcoal, 1,250 people cooked up a storm, and roughly 20,000 people watched as 13.2 tons of beef were prepared.

When all was said and done, Uruguay had beaten Mexico’s record by 4 tons. One of the grillers told Reuters: “I’m very proud to be Uruguayan. We have the best beef and now we have the world’s biggest barbecue.” National pride can be tied together by many things — even apron strings.

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