Farfallegate

TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images Raise your hand if you’re a campaign junkie but consider Bittergate the least controversial controversy the talking heads have concocted so far. (This is what happens when campaigns go too long.) Well, relief is in sight: Cindy McCain steals recipes. Until early Tuesday morning, visitors to John McCain’s campaign Web site ...

595433_080416_mccain2.jpg
595433_080416_mccain2.jpg

TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

Raise your hand if you're a campaign junkie but consider Bittergate the least controversial controversy the talking heads have concocted so far. (This is what happens when campaigns go too long.) Well, relief is in sight: Cindy McCain steals recipes.

Until early Tuesday morning, visitors to John McCain’s campaign Web site could find seven of "Cindy's Recipes," among them three elegant and healthful offerings: passion fruit mousse, ahi tuna with Napa cabbage slaw and farfalle pasta with turkey sausage, peas and mushrooms.

TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

Raise your hand if you’re a campaign junkie but consider Bittergate the least controversial controversy the talking heads have concocted so far. (This is what happens when campaigns go too long.) Well, relief is in sight: Cindy McCain steals recipes.

Until early Tuesday morning, visitors to John McCain’s campaign Web site could find seven of “Cindy’s Recipes,” among them three elegant and healthful offerings: passion fruit mousse, ahi tuna with Napa cabbage slaw and farfalle pasta with turkey sausage, peas and mushrooms.

Only problem was, all three, listed as favorite family recipes of Cindy McCain, Mr. McCain’s wife, were taken verbatim from the Food Network.

And don’t worry — heads are going to roll:

By midmorning, the McCain campaign had taken all seven recipes off the Web site and was pointing a finger at an intern who, tasked several months ago with contacting Mrs. McCain’s staff for favorite McCain recipes, had prowled the Internet instead.

“The intern has been dealt with,” said Tucker Bounds, a campaign spokesman, who declined to provide details. Nonetheless, Mr. Bounds said, “we took away his zero pay.”

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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