Europe sees China as a bigger threat than the United States

More Europeans now consider China a bigger threat to global stability than they do the United States, according to a Harris/FT poll out this week. Granted, the poll was taken over the past few weeks, not the best time for the Chinese given how Tibetan protests and redirected torch relays have dominated the headlines. But ...

More Europeans now consider China a bigger threat to global stability than they do the United States, according to a Harris/FT poll out this week.

Granted, the poll was taken over the past few weeks, not the best time for the Chinese given how Tibetan protests and redirected torch relays have dominated the headlines. But there are still quite a few significant jumps in anti-China sentiment compared to last year.

Percent naming China the greatest threat to global stability:

More Europeans now consider China a bigger threat to global stability than they do the United States, according to a Harris/FT poll out this week.

Granted, the poll was taken over the past few weeks, not the best time for the Chinese given how Tibetan protests and redirected torch relays have dominated the headlines. But there are still quite a few significant jumps in anti-China sentiment compared to last year.

Percent naming China the greatest threat to global stability:

Country 2008 2007
France 36 22
Germany 35 18
Britain 27 16
Italy 47 26

Last year, all four ranked the United States a bigger threat. And within the United States, 31 percent of Americans listed China as the No.1 threat this year, more than Iran or North Korea. 

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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