Morning Brief, Tuesday, April 22

2008 U.S. Elections EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images At long last, the Pennsylvania primary is here. Democratic candidates Barack Obama and especially Hillary Clinton have been going negative in the final days. Here’s what today’s results might mean. Global Economy U.N. World Food Program Director Josette Sheeran is calling for action on global food prices. The G8 ...

595367_080422_pennsylvania2.jpg
595367_080422_pennsylvania2.jpg

2008 U.S. Elections

EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images

At long last, the Pennsylvania primary is here. Democratic candidates Barack Obama and especially Hillary Clinton have been going negative in the final days. Here's what today's results might mean.

2008 U.S. Elections

EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images

At long last, the Pennsylvania primary is here. Democratic candidates Barack Obama and especially Hillary Clinton have been going negative in the final days. Here’s what today’s results might mean.

Global Economy

U.N. World Food Program Director Josette Sheeran is calling for action on global food prices. The G8 plans to address the issue at its summit in July. Price volatility is even hurting U.S. farmers.

The IMF wants oil producers to boost their investment in production capacity.

The Wall Street Journal‘s managing editor will reportedly resign due to editorial differences with new owner Rupert Murdoch.

Americas

Speaking in New Orleans, President George W. Bush and his Mexican and Canadian counterparts defended NAFTA.

Some U.S. women are seeing their life expectancy decline.

The U.S. military is looking for a few good… ex-convicts.

Asia

China’s Shanghai Composite Index has lost half its value since October.

Concerns about a tainted Chinese-made blood thinner have reached 11 countries.

China condemned Paris’s decision to make the Dalai Lama an honorary Parisian.

Samsung’s chairman is stepping down after a tax scandal.

Middle East and Africa

Zimbabwe’s opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai is calling for international help, saying government security forces are waging a campaign of intimidation. President Robert Mugabe’s people say it’s a ploy to let foreigners take over.

Uganda rebels have kidnapped 350 people, according to Amnesty International.

Iraq’s prime minister wants his neighbors to be more supportive. Maybe he should be more supportive of his own communities.

Sudan’s all-important census is going forward. It could pave the way for elections in 2009.

Today’s Agenda

U.S. officials are in North Korea to talk nukes.

Today is Earth Day.

President Bush meets with the North American Competitiveness Council in New Orleans. (Hat tip: On Deadline).

The U.N. Security Council discusses Darfur, Ethiopia, and Eritrea.

Yesterday on Passport

 

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