Feith no more

Al Kamen dishes on former Rumsfeld deputy Douglas J. Feith: Speaking of Iraq, the Georgetown Hoya newspaper last week quoted a student saying she was "displeased that university officials have not asked" former Pentagon undersecretary Douglas Feith "to return to teach next year." Asked about Feith’s status, Robert Gallucci, dean of Georgetown’s foreign service school, ...

Al Kamen dishes on former Rumsfeld deputy Douglas J. Feith:

Speaking of Iraq, the Georgetown Hoya newspaper last week quoted a student saying she was "displeased that university officials have not asked" former Pentagon undersecretary Douglas Feith "to return to teach next year."

Asked about Feith's status, Robert Gallucci, dean of Georgetown's foreign service school, told us that when Feith was hired -- something that caused an uproar among the faculty -- it was understood he "was on a two-year appointment." Any decision not to renew should not be seen as "a judgment on his performance," Gallucci said, noting that Feith's students' "course evaluations were really good."

Al Kamen dishes on former Rumsfeld deputy Douglas J. Feith:

Speaking of Iraq, the Georgetown Hoya newspaper last week quoted a student saying she was "displeased that university officials have not asked" former Pentagon undersecretary Douglas Feith "to return to teach next year."

Asked about Feith’s status, Robert Gallucci, dean of Georgetown’s foreign service school, told us that when Feith was hired — something that caused an uproar among the faculty — it was understood he "was on a two-year appointment." Any decision not to renew should not be seen as "a judgment on his performance," Gallucci said, noting that Feith’s students’ "course evaluations were really good."

Feith, author of a bestseller about his Pentagon days called "War and Decision," said he hadn’t decided what to do next. "I’m intensely occupied with book stuff," and there are "several things I’m thinking about," he said.

Word is that keeping Feith on beyond the two-year term again would have infuriated a number of faculty members. Well, there are always those "dead-enders," as former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld so eloquently noted back in June 2003.

Here’s the original article in the Hoya.

(As an aside, would it kill the Washington Post to link to its sources instead of Google-bombing its own material?)

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