New Baghdad embassy will be part trailer park

Two weeks ago, U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker announced that diplomats and staff could finally move into the massive, new U.S. embassy as early as May. But thanks to a gross underestimation of housing needs, some embassy staff will be forced to remain in their trailers until more rooftop-protected housing can be secured inside ...

595288_070820_fortress_22.jpg
595288_070820_fortress_22.jpg

Two weeks ago, U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker announced that diplomats and staff could finally move into the massive, new U.S. embassy as early as May. But thanks to a gross underestimation of housing needs, some embassy staff will be forced to remain in their trailers until more rooftop-protected housing can be secured inside the compound.

Two weeks ago, U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker announced that diplomats and staff could finally move into the massive, new U.S. embassy as early as May. But thanks to a gross underestimation of housing needs, some embassy staff will be forced to remain in their trailers until more rooftop-protected housing can be secured inside the compound.

Apparently this snafu resulted from housing figures, calculated in 2005, that failed to predict the more than doubling in embassy staff that occured between the start and end of the embassy’s construction.

To make matters worse, a portion of the staff that will remain in the trailers, currently parked behind Saddam Hussein’s former palace (turned U.S. command center) will not be provided with rooftop reinforcement. They will receive some “enhanced protection,” though (read: sandbags).

Without rooftop coverage, the Green Zone’s looking like an awfully rough place to be these days.

Lucy Moore is a researcher at Foreign Policy.

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