Mahathir Mohamad has a blog

ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images Malaysia’s former prime minister of 22 years, Mahathir Mohamad, has a blog in English. It’s named “Chedet” after his pen name, “Che Det” or “Mr. Det,” from his days as a journalist. “Det” is short for “Mahadet,” another way to pronounce his name. Most new bloggers start out by welcoming their readers, ...

595244_080501_mohamad2.jpg
595244_080501_mohamad2.jpg

ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images

Malaysia's former prime minister of 22 years, Mahathir Mohamad, has a blog in English. It's named "Chedet" after his pen name, "Che Det" or "Mr. Det," from his days as a journalist. "Det" is short for "Mahadet," another way to pronounce his name.

Most new bloggers start out by welcoming their readers, explaining why they are blogging, and giving an overview of the subjects they plan to write about. Not so Mahathir, who gives the impression of a man who doesn't think he has to explain himself to anyone. (He was probably motivated by the blogging success of opposition politicians and the fact that the media has been ignoring his escalating criticisms of the current prime minister, Abdullah Ahmad Badawi.)

ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images

Malaysia’s former prime minister of 22 years, Mahathir Mohamad, has a blog in English. It’s named “Chedet” after his pen name, “Che Det” or “Mr. Det,” from his days as a journalist. “Det” is short for “Mahadet,” another way to pronounce his name.

Most new bloggers start out by welcoming their readers, explaining why they are blogging, and giving an overview of the subjects they plan to write about. Not so Mahathir, who gives the impression of a man who doesn’t think he has to explain himself to anyone. (He was probably motivated by the blogging success of opposition politicians and the fact that the media has been ignoring his escalating criticisms of the current prime minister, Abdullah Ahmad Badawi.)

If you’re hoping for some of Mahathir’s signature anti-Western rants, you’ll be sorely disappointed. His first and so far only post is a rather boring critique of Abdullah’s judicial reforms, though this is some quality armchair quarterbacking:

Is the Government proposing to work with the opposition on this issue, and so display its weakness? Will there be a quid pro quo, a bargain with the opposition? It would be interesting to see how the PM proposes to deal with this.

My humble blogging advice for you, Dr. Mahathir? Respond to FP‘s interview with your estranged protégé Anwar Ibrahim, who says you “underestimated” him and wrongly thought you could break him in prison. Blog readers always love a good controversy, and I promise we will link to you.

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