The bounty on this guy’s head? $250 mil

sudantribune.com Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir is not pleased about last weekend’s brazen attack by Darfur rebels. It was the first time fighting has reached the outskirts of Khartoum not just in the bloody five years of fighting in Darfur, but in  the decades of conflict in Sudan. Bashir is so peeved that he’s put ...

595074_080513_Khalil_Ibrahim2.jpg
595074_080513_Khalil_Ibrahim2.jpg

sudantribune.com

Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir is not pleased about last weekend's brazen attack by Darfur rebels. It was the first time fighting has reached the outskirts of Khartoum not just in the bloody five years of fighting in Darfur, but in  the decades of conflict in Sudan.

Bashir is so peeved that he's put an astonishing $250 million reward on the head of rebel leader Khalil Ibrahim (pictured). For reference, that's 10 times the reward for Osama bin Laden.

sudantribune.com

Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir is not pleased about last weekend’s brazen attack by Darfur rebels. It was the first time fighting has reached the outskirts of Khartoum not just in the bloody five years of fighting in Darfur, but in  the decades of conflict in Sudan.

Bashir is so peeved that he’s put an astonishing $250 million reward on the head of rebel leader Khalil Ibrahim (pictured). For reference, that’s 10 times the reward for Osama bin Laden.

Why the enormous bounty? Perhaps Ibrahim’s fighting words have Bashir concerned. Here’s Ibrahim in an interview yesterday, according to the IHT:

This is just the start of a process, and the end is the termination of this regime…Don’t expect just one more attack. This is just the beginning.”

Bashir also cut diplomatic ties with Chad on Sunday, accusing Chadian President Idriss Deby, who is from the same tribe as Ibrahim, of backing the attack. This is going to get worse before it gets better. 

UPDATE: If $250 mil sounds like an absurd amount (and it does), then that’s because it is. When it was reported by the Sudanese state media yesterday, it came across as just another attention-getting ploy, and that if someone actually caught Ibrahim, Bashir and his cronies would make the bounty hunter an offer he couldn’t refuse, and he’d go away with far, far less. But try three zeros less: Apparently, there was currency confusion in the Sudanese government. The reward of 500 million Sudanese pounds (the equivalent of $250 mil) was offered in new Sudanese pounds, according to state media. The country revalued its currency last year, and the new pounds are worth 1,000 times the old ones. But the information office came out today and said that they’re using old Sudanese pounds for some reason, so we’re talking peanuts for Ibrahim: $250,000.

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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