McCain’s dictator problem

Craig Mitchelldyer/Getty Images Yesterday, John McCain’s campaign announced that the candidate’s wife Cindy has sold off $2 million she held in mutual funds that include Sudanese businesses. The Wall Street Journal also reported that McCain shares a consulting firm with the Vladimir Putin-backed Party of the Regions in Ukraine. This follows last weekend’s firing of ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
595038_080515_mccain_810628772.jpg
595038_080515_mccain_810628772.jpg

Craig Mitchelldyer/Getty Images

Yesterday, John McCain's campaign announced that the candidate's wife Cindy has sold off $2 million she held in mutual funds that include Sudanese businesses. The Wall Street Journal also reported that McCain shares a consulting firm with the Vladimir Putin-backed Party of the Regions in Ukraine.

This follows last weekend's firing of McCain's mid-Atlantic regional manager and convention CEO when it was revealed that they had lobbied for the Burmese government in Washington. McCain, who fancies himself the scourge of totalitarian regimes worldwide, has now vowed to do a more thorough job vetting his campaign hirings.

Craig Mitchelldyer/Getty Images

Yesterday, John McCain’s campaign announced that the candidate’s wife Cindy has sold off $2 million she held in mutual funds that include Sudanese businesses. The Wall Street Journal also reported that McCain shares a consulting firm with the Vladimir Putin-backed Party of the Regions in Ukraine.

This follows last weekend’s firing of McCain’s mid-Atlantic regional manager and convention CEO when it was revealed that they had lobbied for the Burmese government in Washington. McCain, who fancies himself the scourge of totalitarian regimes worldwide, has now vowed to do a more thorough job vetting his campaign hirings.

To be fair, there’s no evidence that his wife’s investments or his advisors’ lobbying ties have in any way influenced McCain’s stances on these countries. Indeed, McCain has always been an outspoken supporter of Ukraine’s Orange Revolution and has called for international action against the “thugs” in the Burmese junta. But this has been an election where candidates have been judged by their associations (see: Wright, Jeremiah) as much or more than by their positions, statements, and political record. So McCain’s new caution about who gets a seat on the straight-talk express is probably a smart move.

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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