Have a question for Serge Michel?

Adam Blenford/Flickr/Creative Commons Few Westerners have had the chance to witness what China is building in Africa. From Angola to the Sudan, the Middle Kingdom’s reach throughout the continent is growing by the day. And, for several years, Swiss journalist Serge Michel got the chance to document Africa’s relationship with its new patron. In the ...

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594904_166-chinaafrica2.jpg

Adam Blenford/Flickr/Creative Commons

Few Westerners have had the chance to witness what China is building in Africa. From Angola to the Sudan, the Middle Kingdom’s reach throughout the continent is growing by the day. And, for several years, Swiss journalist Serge Michel got the chance to document Africa’s relationship with its new patron.

In the current issue of FP, Michel shows firsthand what happens when a budding superpower meets the poverty, corruption, and fragility of Africa. It’s a fascinating look at what China has been able to accomplish in a place other powers have all but abandoned—and a glimpse into what happens next. But it’s also one that raises as many questions as it answers. Luckily, Serge Michel will respond to your questions next week. So read “When China Met Africa,” and send your questions to letters@ForeignPolicy.com by Sunday night. We’ll send the best on to him. Don't forget to check back on May 30, when we'll post his responses.

Adam Blenford/Flickr/Creative Commons

Few Westerners have had the chance to witness what China is building in Africa. From Angola to the Sudan, the Middle Kingdom’s reach throughout the continent is growing by the day. And, for several years, Swiss journalist Serge Michel got the chance to document Africa’s relationship with its new patron.

In the current issue of FP, Michel shows firsthand what happens when a budding superpower meets the poverty, corruption, and fragility of Africa. It’s a fascinating look at what China has been able to accomplish in a place other powers have all but abandoned—and a glimpse into what happens next. But it’s also one that raises as many questions as it answers. Luckily, Serge Michel will respond to your questions next week. So read “When China Met Africa,” and send your questions to letters@ForeignPolicy.com by Sunday night. We’ll send the best on to him. Don’t forget to check back on May 30, when we’ll post his responses.

Kate Palmer is deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy.

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