Morning Brief: Iran won’t come clean

Top Story FILE; AXEL SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images In what Elaine Sciolino of the New York Times calls an “unusually blunt and detailed report,” the International Atomic Energy Agency says Iran hasn’t explained evidence suggesting its nuclear program is intended for military use. The agency says it will take months to reach firm conclusions about Iran’s capabilities ...

594900_080527_iaea2.jpg
594900_080527_iaea2.jpg

Top Story

FILE; AXEL SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images

In what Elaine Sciolino of the New York Times calls an "unusually blunt and detailed report," the International Atomic Energy Agency says Iran hasn't explained evidence suggesting its nuclear program is intended for military use. The agency says it will take months to reach firm conclusions about Iran's capabilities and intentions.

Top Story

FILE; AXEL SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images

In what Elaine Sciolino of the New York Times calls an “unusually blunt and detailed report,” the International Atomic Energy Agency says Iran hasn’t explained evidence suggesting its nuclear program is intended for military use. The agency says it will take months to reach firm conclusions about Iran’s capabilities and intentions.

Decision ’08

Speaking on Memorial Day, presidential hopefuls John McCain and Barack Obama drove home sharply different messages on Iraq. Over the weekend, McCain invited Obama to tour the war-torn country with him.

Regarding Iran, Obama said he wouldn’t guarantee President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad a meeting. Even the Bush administration has sometimes engaged Sudan, the Post notes.

The New York Times profiles Reggie Love, Obama’s “body man” on the campaign trail.

Americas

Canada’s foreign minister resigned after leaving secure documents in his girlfriend’s apartment.

The U.S. auto industry is “getting sideswiped by the housing crisis,” according to Eric Dash of the New York Times.

El Companero Fidel weighs in on Barack Obama’s Cuba speech.

Middle East and Africa

Hezbollah warned Lebanon’s new president not to mess with its weapons.

Peacekeeping troops and aid workers have abused children, according to a British-based charity.

Radical Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, a recovering video-game addict, is trying to burnish his image.

Robert Mugabe called a U.S. diplomat a “prostitute.”

Asia

The global outpouring of aid for China’s earthquake victims has “dissipated a sour, nationalistic mood,” according to Edward Cody of the Washington Post.

Chengdu residents still fear further aftershocks. Chinese officials have been working around the clock to drain a dangerous “quake lake” formed by landslides.

Burma’s ruling junta had some uncharacteristically kind words for U.N. aid workers.

Global Economy

With gas prices soaring, Americans have curtailed their driving with record speed. Police across the United States are riding bikes to save gas.

Japan’s government puts the “real” price of a barrel of oil at around $60.

The U.S. Federal Reserve has begun monitoring Wall St. firms from the inside.

Space

The Phoenix lander enjoyed its first full day on Mars Monday.

Today’s Agenda

It’s Henry Kissinger’s 85th birthday.

EU ministers are meeting in Brussels, with Georgia high on the agenda.

Tag: Iran

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