Morning Brief: Supreme Court rules on Guantanamo

Top Story Mark Wilson/Getty Images The U.S. Supreme Court ruled, in a 5-4 decision, that detainees at Guantánamo Bay do have some legal rights, including the right to challenge their detention. The New York Times looks at options for the controversial facility and its occupants in the wake of Thursday’s bombshell. The Washington Post gets ...

594639_080613_supremes2.jpg
594639_080613_supremes2.jpg

Top Story

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled, in a 5-4 decision, that detainees at Guantánamo Bay do have some legal rights, including the right to challenge their detention. The New York Times looks at options for the controversial facility and its occupants in the wake of Thursday's bombshell.

Top Story

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled, in a 5-4 decision, that detainees at Guantánamo Bay do have some legal rights, including the right to challenge their detention. The New York Times looks at options for the controversial facility and its occupants in the wake of Thursday’s bombshell.

The Washington Post gets reactions from presidential candidates John McCain and Barack Obama.

Americas

ExxonMobil plans to sell 2,200 of its least profitable gas stations.

Canada apologized for its historically poor treatment of indigenous peoples.

Violent militias are taking over the slums of Rio de Janeiro.

Global Economy

OPEC sees growth in demand for oil slackening as the U.S. economy slows down. High oil prices have pushed up the rate of inflation in the United States.

Trade liberalization is coming to a “to a screeching halt,” according to Fred Bergsten of the Peterson Center for International Economics.

No surprise here: overwhelming majorities in China and India see their country’s economy as “good.”

Middle East and Africa

Talks on the status of U.S. troops in Iraq have “reached a dead end,” according to Iraqi PM Nuri al-Maliki.

Hamas admitted that an explosion in Gaza, which it initially blamed on Israel, was its own fault.

Zimbabwe has again detained the country’s top opposition leader, and his deputy has been charged with treason. Mugabe indicated Friday that he would rather start a civil war than lose the upcoming election.

Asia

China and Taiwan agreed to permit direct flights for the first time since 1949.

Japan says it will partially lift its sanctions on North Korea. More here.

Japan has embarked on a massive national weight-loss regime.

Europe

Preliminary indications suggest that Ireland voted “no” to the EU treaty.

U.S. President George W. Bush met with Pope Benedict in the Vatican Gardens.

Today’s Agenda

Pakistan’s protesting lawyers are due to reach Islamabad today.

G8 finance ministers are meeting in Osaka, Japan, through Saturday to discuss inflation and the weak dollar.

President Bush heads to Paris to address the OECD, the developed world’s economic think tank.

Yesterday on Passport

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