Morning Brief: Guantanamo revelations

Top Story Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images “If the detainee dies, you’re doing it wrong.” That’s what a CIA lawyer told military and intelligence officials about interrogations in Guantánamo back in 2002, according to documents released by the U.S. Senate. “[I]f someone dies while aggressive techniques are being used, regardless of cause of death, the backlash of ...

594579_080618_levin2.jpg
594579_080618_levin2.jpg

Top Story

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

"If the detainee dies, you're doing it wrong." That's what a CIA lawyer told military and intelligence officials about interrogations in Guantánamo back in 2002, according to documents released by the U.S. Senate. "[I]f someone dies while aggressive techniques are being used, regardless of cause of death, the backlash of attention would be severely detrimental," the lawyer added. Officials also hid certain detainees from the International Committee of the Red Cross.

Top Story

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

“If the detainee dies, you’re doing it wrong.” That’s what a CIA lawyer told military and intelligence officials about interrogations in Guantánamo back in 2002, according to documents released by the U.S. Senate. “[I]f someone dies while aggressive techniques are being used, regardless of cause of death, the backlash of attention would be severely detrimental,” the lawyer added. Officials also hid certain detainees from the International Committee of the Red Cross.

Asia

Afghan and NATO forces have launched a “huge offensive” against Taliban positions outside Kandahar.

Burma’s humanitarian disaster after Cyclone Nargis was not as bad as originally reported.

Multinational companies are beginning to find China too expensive.

China and Japan have reached agreement on disputed gas fields in the East China Sea.

Middle East and Africa

Iraq’s fragile calm was shattered Tuesday by a massive explosion in a Shiite neighborhood of Baghdad.

Israel has confirmed its ceasefire agreement with Hamas.

Americas

Fidel Castro appeared on Cuban television for the first time since January.

Europe

A radical preacher linked to Osama bin Laden has been freed on bail in Britain.

A Russian cloud-seeding experiment went awry when a 55-lb bag of cement landed on a house.

Meet Curveball, the Iraqi defector who maintains he is “not guilty” of spreading disinformation about WMD.

Decision ’08

John McCain and Barack Obama traded barbs on terrorism.

Today’s Agenda

President Bush plans to ask Congress to lift the federal ban on offshore oil drilling.

Bush will also welcome Bulgaria’s prime minister to the White House.

Belgian truckers are going on strike to protest high fuel prices.

Yesterday on Passport

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.