Morning Brief: Saved by the Dutch

Top Story ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images The U.N. Security Council has roundly condemned the pre-electoral violence in Zimbabwe. Fearing for his safety, opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai has taken refuge in the Dutch Embassy in Harare. Decision ’08 A top John McCain advisor apologized for saying that a terrorist attack would be a “big advantage” to the ...

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594507_080624_dutch5.jpg

Top Story

ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images

The U.N. Security Council has roundly condemned the pre-electoral violence in Zimbabwe. Fearing for his safety, opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai has taken refuge in the Dutch Embassy in Harare.

Top Story

ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images

The U.N. Security Council has roundly condemned the pre-electoral violence in Zimbabwe. Fearing for his safety, opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai has taken refuge in the Dutch Embassy in Harare.

Decision ’08

A top John McCain advisor apologized for saying that a terrorist attack would be a “big advantage” to the Republican nominee.

Muslim Americans are feeling snubbed by Barack Obama.

Americas

A new survey by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life shows that religious Americans are broadly tolerant of other faiths.

Argentina’s striking farmers are damaging the country’s economy and reputation.

Global Economy

Under intense political pressure, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission has agreed to investigate to what extent speculators are driving up commodity prices.

Asia

Chinese steel manufacturers agreed to a nearly 100 percent rise in prices for iron ore.

Tourism is drying up in China ahead of the Olympics. Meanwhile, New York is eager to welcome a coming wave of Chinese tourists.

Former Pakistani PM Nawaz Sharif has been declared ineligible to run for parliament, a decision that spells trouble for the ruling coalition.

Middle East and Africa

Two new U.S. government reports see big security gains in Iraq, but little political and economic progress.

In a Knesset address, French President Nicolas Sarkozy urged Israel to halt settlements and share Jerusalem with the Palestinians. He also offered troops, saying, “You can trust France.”

Europe

Stagflation is rearing its ugly head in the eurozone.

The failure of Lisbon could make it tougher to reach an EU-Russia accord.

Amnesty International is taking aim at European countries’ role in the United States’ secret rendition and detention programs. (Report here.)

Today’s Agenda

Berlin is hosting a summit on Palestinian security, with U.S. Secretary Condoleezza Rice in attendance.

U.S. President George W. Bush welcomes Vietnam’s prime minister to the White House, as well as the president of the Philippines.

Israeli PM Ehud Olmert is paying a visit to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.

The U.N. Security Council is discussing the situation in Sudan.

Yesterday on Passport

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