What We’re Reading

Preeti Aroon The Post-American World by Fareed Zakaria. “This is a book not about the decline of America but rather about the rise of everyone else,” Zakaria writes. The United States isn’t going to be No. 1 in everything much longer, and as “the rest” gains power, expect nationalism to rise the world over. (Note: ...

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Preeti Aroon

The Post-American World by Fareed Zakaria. "This is a book not about the decline of America but rather about the rise of everyone else," Zakaria writes. The United States isn't going to be No. 1 in everything much longer, and as "the rest" gains power, expect nationalism to rise the world over. (Note: Zakaria refers to "Rogue Aid," a column by FP Editor in Chief Moisés Naím, on page 117.)

Alex Ely

Preeti Aroon

The Post-American World by Fareed Zakaria. “This is a book not about the decline of America but rather about the rise of everyone else,” Zakaria writes. The United States isn’t going to be No. 1 in everything much longer, and as “the rest” gains power, expect nationalism to rise the world over. (Note: Zakaria refers to “Rogue Aid,” a column by FP Editor in Chief Moisés Naím, on page 117.)

Alex Ely

An quirky piece in the New York Sun shows that not only will the United States have a left-handed president in January (Obama and McCain are both southpaws) but that over the past 35 years, five U.S. Presidents have been lefties. This is hardly representative of the national average, where only 10 percent of Americans are lefties.

Patrick Fitzgerald

What Does China Think? While the West sees a country chasing capitalism with reckless abandon, self-proclaimed “accidental Sinologist” Mark Leonard chronicles a growing intellectual rift in China between a “New Right” and “New Left” over the role of government in the market and how to address rising concerns about inequality and corruption.

Katie Hunter

The Border Fence Folly” in The New Republic. Melanie Mason gives six reasons why a (bigger) U.S.-Mexico border fence won’t work. Some of her arguments are nothing new — border fencing is enormously costly and also ineffective at stemming the immigrant tide. “Legal dubiousness” and “environmental impact” are two more surprising arguments against the wall. Homeland Security head Michael Chertoff recently waived more than 30 environmental and land-management laws to further fence construction, jeopardizing regional wildlife and vegetation.

Joshua Keating

Traffic incident gives insight into Russia’s corrupt legal system,” by Mark Franchetti in the Sunday Times. This is a better read than the matter-of-fact headline would suggest. After driving his motorcycle onto the sidewalk and nearly colliding with a Moscow prosecutor, a Times correspondent finds himself on the wrong side of Russia’s arbitrary judicial system.

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