Who should be in the Free Market Hall of Fame?

U.S. Library of Congress Which economists, journalists, and business leaders are doing the best job of advancing free markets and free people? You can make your opinions known by voting for nominees for the Free Market Hall of Fame. At this year’s FreedomFest—which describes itself as the world’s largest annual gathering of free minds and ...

594286_080703_carnegie5.jpg
594286_080703_carnegie5.jpg

U.S. Library of Congress

Which economists, journalists, and business leaders are doing the best job of advancing free markets and free people? You can make your opinions known by voting for nominees for the Free Market Hall of Fame.

At this year's FreedomFest—which describes itself as the world's largest annual gathering of free minds and is the brainchild of contrarian economist Mark Skousen—the first five members of the Free Market Hall of Fame will be inducted at a July 12 gala banquet in Las Vegas. Unlike with FP's top public intellectuals poll, however, the nominees receiving the highest vote counts won't necessarily make it into the Hall of Fame. Rather, "[a] select group of economists and other free-market supporters will make the final decision and vote on upcoming Hall of Fame members," according to the hall's Web site. I guess the Hall of Fame isn't ready to surrender the commanding heights to the tyranny of the Internet majority.

U.S. Library of Congress

Which economists, journalists, and business leaders are doing the best job of advancing free markets and free people? You can make your opinions known by voting for nominees for the Free Market Hall of Fame.

At this year’s FreedomFest—which describes itself as the world’s largest annual gathering of free minds and is the brainchild of contrarian economist Mark Skousen—the first five members of the Free Market Hall of Fame will be inducted at a July 12 gala banquet in Las Vegas. Unlike with FP‘s top public intellectuals poll, however, the nominees receiving the highest vote counts won’t necessarily make it into the Hall of Fame. Rather, “[a] select group of economists and other free-market supporters will make the final decision and vote on upcoming Hall of Fame members,” according to the hall’s Web site. I guess the Hall of Fame isn’t ready to surrender the commanding heights to the tyranny of the Internet majority.

Meanwhile, I recommend voting for Andrew Carnegie for question 6: “Vote for your favorite free market business leader and entrepreneur (past).” Without this industrialist and philanthropist, FP‘s publisher, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, wouldn’t be here!

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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