Morning Brief: U.S. consulate attacked in Istanbul

Top Story Getty Images Six people, three Turkish police and three gunmen, are dead after a thwarted attack on the U.S. consulate in Istanbul. One assailant managed to drive away after a 15-minute gunbattle. No Americans were injured or killed in the assault on the consulate, which is heavily fortified. “There is no doubt that ...

594151_080709_istanbul5.jpg
594151_080709_istanbul5.jpg

Top Story

Getty Images

Six people, three Turkish police and three gunmen, are dead after a thwarted attack on the U.S. consulate in Istanbul. One assailant managed to drive away after a 15-minute gunbattle. No Americans were injured or killed in the assault on the consulate, which is heavily fortified. "There is no doubt that this was a terrorist attack," Istanbul's governor told the press, but authorities aren't sure who was behind it. Two of the slain attackers have been identified as Turkish, however.

Top Story

Getty Images

Six people, three Turkish police and three gunmen, are dead after a thwarted attack on the U.S. consulate in Istanbul. One assailant managed to drive away after a 15-minute gunbattle. No Americans were injured or killed in the assault on the consulate, which is heavily fortified. “There is no doubt that this was a terrorist attack,” Istanbul’s governor told the press, but authorities aren’t sure who was behind it. Two of the slain attackers have been identified as Turkish, however.

Decision ’08

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Global Economy

General Motors, facing a cash crunch, is under pressure to recapitalize.

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U.S. President George W. Bush said that “significant progress” was made on climate change at the G-8 summit.

Asia

Meeting in Japan, President Bush and Indian PM Manmohan Singh reaffirmed their commitment to a controversial bilateral nuclear-cooperation deal.

U.S. Marines deployed in southern Afghanistan say they’ve killed some 400 Taliban since late April.

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Middle East and Africa

Iran tested nine of its missiles in a pointed warning to Israel and the United States. The White House told the Iranians to stop.

Playing all sides of the fence, Qatar aims to be the Middle East’s master mediator.

The United States is pushing for U.N. sanctions on Zimbabwe.

Europe

Russia warned that it will react with “military-technical methods” if missile shield components are deployed in the Czech Republic.

European legislators voted to lower the EU’s biofuels target.

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Today’s Agenda

The G8 summit ends.

Thailand’s former prime minister goes on trial for corruption.

The House Committee on Foreign Affairs is holding a hearing on U.S. policy toward Iran.

Washington hosts the National Muslim American Young Leaders Summit.

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