This Week in China

Top Story JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images Over the weekend, U.S. President George W. Bush resisted calls to boycott next month’s opening ceremonies in Beijing, saying that to do so “would be an affront to the Chinese people.” Bush reaffirmed his positions on human rights and religous freedom in China, but said he did not want to ...

594136_080709_chinabrief5.jpg
594136_080709_chinabrief5.jpg

Top Story

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

Over the weekend, U.S. President George W. Bush resisted calls to boycott next month's opening ceremonies in Beijing, saying that to do so "would be an affront to the Chinese people." Bush reaffirmed his positions on human rights and religous freedom in China, but said he did not want to endanger his ability to "speak frankly" with Chinese leaders.

Top Story

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

Over the weekend, U.S. President George W. Bush resisted calls to boycott next month’s opening ceremonies in Beijing, saying that to do so “would be an affront to the Chinese people.” Bush reaffirmed his positions on human rights and religous freedom in China, but said he did not want to endanger his ability to “speak frankly” with Chinese leaders.

In a reversal, French President Nicolas Sarkozy’s office announced Wednesday he would in fact attend the opening ceremonies. Chinese officals responded by warning Sarkozy against meeting with the Dalai Lama in France next month.

Economy

A new report by Carnegie Senior Associate Albert Keidel finds that the Chinese economy will surpass that of the United States by 2035 and be twice its size by midcentury.

China and Russia are leading the opposition by five developing countries to the emissions targets endorsed earlier this week by the G-8. Still, the 15 “major economies” committed to long-range emissions cuts in principle.

China signed an agreement with the government of Niger to help improve power supplies to the African country, which has recently hosted Chinese companies exploring for uranium and oil.

China is keeping pace with the United States in trade with Africa. (More on China in Africa here.)

Indian silk producers are the latest to feel the fallout from May’s earthquake in Sichuan.

For the first time since 1999, new Chinese banknotes will not feature the image of Mao.

Olympics

Hundreds of factories in Tangshan and Tianjin will shut down soon in an effort to improve air quality during the games.

Banned by Mao in the 60s, America’s national pastime isn’t quite catching on in China, despite the help of some former-MLB talent.

The China Christian Council will pass out tens of thousands of free Bibles during the Olympics.

Politics

China’s Foreign Ministry announced that, after a nine-month delay, formal negotiations with North Korea on its nuclear weapons program will resume Thursday.

Health

A new study finds that 25 percent of Chinese adults are considered overweight or obese.

The BBC discovered that Beijing is still failing to meet air quality standards set by the World Health Program, despite promises to do so by next month’s Olympics.

China Moment

Chinese officals are cracking down on skimpy outfits in discos, karaoke bars, and other entertainment venues. The rules, which say workers should dress “tastefully,” come part of an effort to crack down on prostitution and drugs.

Patrick Fitzgerald is a researcher at Foreign Policy.

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