Obama endorses Beijing Olympics

Well, sort of. The seemingly ubiquitous presidential candidate has shelled out $5 million to join McDonalds and Anheuser-Busch as major advertiser during NBC’s coverage of next month’s Olympics. The ad buy is the largest by any presidential candidate on network television in the last 16 years, AdAge reports: While Rudy Giuliani’s campaign did a tiny ...

593749_080724_beijingnbc5.jpg
593749_080724_beijingnbc5.jpg

Well, sort of. The seemingly ubiquitous presidential candidate has shelled out $5 million to join McDonalds and Anheuser-Busch as major advertiser during NBC's coverage of next month's Olympics.

The ad buy is the largest by any presidential candidate on network television in the last 16 years, AdAge reports:

While Rudy Giuliani's campaign did a tiny buy to air political ads on "Fox News Sunday" in consecutive weeks, the Obama campaign's spending on the high-rated and expensive Olympics top anything that has been done on network TV by presidential candidates in years.

Well, sort of. The seemingly ubiquitous presidential candidate has shelled out $5 million to join McDonalds and Anheuser-Busch as major advertiser during NBC’s coverage of next month’s Olympics.

The ad buy is the largest by any presidential candidate on network television in the last 16 years, AdAge reports:

While Rudy Giuliani’s campaign did a tiny buy to air political ads on “Fox News Sunday” in consecutive weeks, the Obama campaign’s spending on the high-rated and expensive Olympics top anything that has been done on network TV by presidential candidates in years.

Traditionally, campaigns target cheaper cable ads in crucial swing states. The last candidate to buck the trend was Bob Dole in 1996. Flush with youthful exuberance and record-breaking cash on hand, the Obama team thinks its campaign will meet a different fate than Dole’s.

Patrick Fitzgerald is a researcher at Foreign Policy.

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