Morning Brief: Suicide bombers shatter calm in Iraq

Top Story ALI YUSSEF/AFP/Getty Images In a grim reminder that Iraq remains perilous, at least 50 people were killed and nearly 250 wounded in suicide attacks in Baghdad and Kirkuk. In Baghdad, three attacks carried out by female suicide bombers targeted Shiite pilgrims. In Kirkuk, bombs appeared aimed at Kurds protesting a provincial elections law. ...

593716_080728_iraq2.jpg
593716_080728_iraq2.jpg

Top Story

ALI YUSSEF/AFP/Getty Images

In a grim reminder that Iraq remains perilous, at least 50 people were killed and nearly 250 wounded in suicide attacks in Baghdad and Kirkuk. In Baghdad, three attacks carried out by female suicide bombers targeted Shiite pilgrims. In Kirkuk, bombs appeared aimed at Kurds protesting a provincial elections law.

Top Story

ALI YUSSEF/AFP/Getty Images

In a grim reminder that Iraq remains perilous, at least 50 people were killed and nearly 250 wounded in suicide attacks in Baghdad and Kirkuk. In Baghdad, three attacks carried out by female suicide bombers targeted Shiite pilgrims. In Kirkuk, bombs appeared aimed at Kurds protesting a provincial elections law.

Decision ’08

Barack Obama said that Iran should take the Bush administration’s diplomatic signaling seriously.

Obama’s half-brother exports low-cost Chinese goods from his home city of Shenzen.

A new ad from John McCain criticizes Obama for not visiting wounded troops while the Illinois senator was in Germany.

John Harwood probes the enthusiasm gap.

Global Economy

Trade talks are being held up by a dispute over bananas. The United States blames China and India, however.

In an ominous sign, U.S. banks are reducing business loans.

Countries that subsidize gasoline are pushing up prices for everyone else.

Americas

Mexicans voted Sunday on a plan to open up the country’s oil industry to foreign investment.

Asia

India is reeling after a spate of recent terrorist attacks. B Raman comments.

Negotiators have reached a “breakthrough” in talks between the Philippines government and Muslim rebels.

Beijing is considering extraordinary measures to bring down pollution levels.

Middle East and Africa

Gen. David Petraeus, the top American commander in Iraq, doesn’t support the idea of a timetable for withdrawal of U.S. troops.

Seventeen people were killed in a bombing attack in Istanbul.

Europe

MI5 remains concerned about terrorist plots in Northern Ireland.

British PM Gordon Brown’s popularity is plummeting.

Russia is proposing a new security pact intended to sideline NATO.

Today’s Agenda

Turkey’s top court convenes today to decide whether the country’s ruling party violates the constitution.

Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani meets with U.S. President George W. Bush at the White House.

Belgrade is gearing up for a backlash over the arrest of Radovan Kardzic.

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez turns 54.

Tag: Iraq

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