Morning Brief: Trouble for Obama?

Top Story Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images USA Today reports on a new poll showing that John McCain may be gaining ground on Barack Obama, who has apparently failed to convince more voters that he is ready to be commander in chief. McCain leads among likely voters, 49 to 45 percent. The Illinois senator, however, thinks his ...

593680_080729_obama5.jpg
593680_080729_obama5.jpg

Top Story

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

USA Today reports on a new poll showing that John McCain may be gaining ground on Barack Obama, who has apparently failed to convince more voters that he is ready to be commander in chief. McCain leads among likely voters, 49 to 45 percent. The Illinois senator, however, thinks his odds of winning are "very good," and Republicans complain that McCain's campaign is always a step behind.

Top Story

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

USA Today reports on a new poll showing that John McCain may be gaining ground on Barack Obama, who has apparently failed to convince more voters that he is ready to be commander in chief. McCain leads among likely voters, 49 to 45 percent. The Illinois senator, however, thinks his odds of winning are “very good,” and Republicans complain that McCain’s campaign is always a step behind.

Veepstakes: Obama is seriously considering Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine as a running mate; Hillary Clinton, not so much. Obama’s comments indicate he is looking outside the Beltway for his vice presidential pick.

McCain told Larry King he could support a 16-month timetable in Iraq, depending on conditions.

Global Economy

The IMF has issued a grim report on the credit crisis. Read it here.

GM’s revival plan? New logos.

Americas

In a non-binding referendum, Mexican voters expressed their opposition to President Felipe Calderon’s plan to invite more private-sector involvement in the oil industry.

Asia

A U.S. missile strike killed al Qaeda’s chemical and biological weapons expert, Pakistani officials say. Pakistan is reportedly planning to move a unit of its regular army into the tribal areas, a key demand of the United States.

Beijing is using walls and screens to hide areas of the city deemed untidy.

Amnesty International is looking at China’s human rights record through “tainted glasses,” according to a Foreign Ministry spokesman.

Middle East and Africa

Israeli PM Ehud Olmert indicated Monday that a peace deal with the Palestinians is not reachable this year; U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice is nonetheless pressing ahead.

Economic troubles are driving Syria’s bid for peace.

Iraqis and American troops are attacking one of al Qaeda’s few remaining strongholds in Iraq.

Europe

Russian scientists claim to have broken the record for deepest freshwater dive.

Paris is considering an electric car-sharing program.

Parts of Budapest were evacuated after a two-ton bomb left over from WWII was discovered at a construction site.

Today’s Agenda

EU officials are meeting in Brussels to consider Serbia’s case for membership.

The ninth day of global trade talks at the WTO could end in collapse.

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