This Week in China

Andrew Wong/Getty Images Top Story Olympic security concerns were heightened after two assailants killed 16 policemen and injured 16 more in China’s western Xinjiang region on Monday. Authorities said the assault was a terrorist attack by suspects who had been trained abroad. Xinjiang’s Uighur Muslims are on edge, and Chinese authorities even more so, locking ...

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593474_080806_yao5.jpg

Andrew Wong/Getty Images

Top Story

Olympic security concerns were heightened after two assailants killed 16 policemen and injured 16 more in China's western Xinjiang region on Monday. Authorities said the assault was a terrorist attack by suspects who had been trained abroad. Xinjiang's Uighur Muslims are on edge, and Chinese authorities even more so, locking down the region and beating up two Japanese journalists attemping to report in Kashgar.

Andrew Wong/Getty Images

Top Story

Olympic security concerns were heightened after two assailants killed 16 policemen and injured 16 more in China’s western Xinjiang region on Monday. Authorities said the assault was a terrorist attack by suspects who had been trained abroad. Xinjiang’s Uighur Muslims are on edge, and Chinese authorities even more so, locking down the region and beating up two Japanese journalists attemping to report in Kashgar.

With the security crackdown in Beijing also underway, President Bush plans to give a speech in Thailand on Thursday to express “deep concerns over religious freedom and human rights” in China. Authorities have already detained foreign protesters staging demonstrations and are denying visas to those with ties to activism, even former Olympian and Darfur activist Joey Cheek.

More Olympics

China has failed to keep the promises it made when bidding for the games, McClatchy reports.

Beijing’s taxis have been installed with microphones, ostensibly for driver safety, that can eavesdrop on passengers.

Organizers asserted that Beijing’s haze was only mist. For more on Beijing’s wacky weather, check out FP‘s Seven Questions intervew with David G. Streets, whose work influenced China’s cleanup efforts.

Economy

China’s economy is slowing down.

Move over low-end manufacturing: China wants to go high-tech.

Organic farming is taking root.

Politics

Despite a row over food exports, Beijing is improving ties with Japan, as well as Taiwan.

The new United States embassy in Beijing also opens on Friday, complete with special precautions to prevent bugging.

Taiwan

The Taiwanese national team nearly pulled out of the Olympics after a controversy over the delegation’s name. Beijing, however, backed down.

In a sign of improving business ties with the mainland, Taiwan’s cabinet will allow Chinese investors to buy into its stock market.

General

A powerful earthquake aftershock killed three in Sichuan province.

Patrick Fitzgerald is a researcher at Foreign Policy.
Tag: China

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