Whoops

Here at FP, we love Caijing. We named its fearless managing editor, Hu Shuli, to our list of the world’s top 100 public intellectuals. And this is how John Pomfret, the Washington Post‘s Outlook section editor, described the publication earlier this year in a fascinating review for Foreign Policy: An amalgam of Forbes, Fortune, and ...

593451_080807_caijing6.jpg
593451_080807_caijing6.jpg

Here at FP, we love Caijing. We named its fearless managing editor, Hu Shuli, to our list of the world's top 100 public intellectuals. And this is how John Pomfret, the Washington Post's Outlook section editor, described the publication earlier this year in a fascinating review for Foreign Policy:

An amalgam of Forbes, Fortune, and BusinessWeek, with a muckraking edge that makes it hard to categorize, Caijing is China's leading financial magazine. With a circulation of about 100,000, Caijing focuses most of its energy on battling the crony capitalism widespread in China's business world. Occasionally, it takes even bigger risks by tackling Chinese government officials themselves, such as with the magazine's in-depth and influential coverage of the SARS epidemic in 2002.

That said, this is a pretty unfortunate truncation boo-boo:

Here at FP, we love Caijing. We named its fearless managing editor, Hu Shuli, to our list of the world’s top 100 public intellectuals. And this is how John Pomfret, the Washington Post‘s Outlook section editor, described the publication earlier this year in a fascinating review for Foreign Policy:

An amalgam of Forbes, Fortune, and BusinessWeek, with a muckraking edge that makes it hard to categorize, Caijing is China’s leading financial magazine. With a circulation of about 100,000, Caijing focuses most of its energy on battling the crony capitalism widespread in China’s business world. Occasionally, it takes even bigger risks by tackling Chinese government officials themselves, such as with the magazine’s in-depth and influential coverage of the SARS epidemic in 2002.

That said, this is a pretty unfortunate truncation boo-boo:

The real headline is below:

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