Morning Brief: Russia rejects cease-fire offer

Top Story DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP/Getty Images So much for the Olympic truce. As Russian forces pushed into Georgia proper, French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner (right, in Gori) was scrambling to contain a conflict that has entered its fourth day. Georgian soldiers, beating a hasty retreat through the besieged town of Gori, looked in vain for the ...

593375_080811_kouchner5.jpg
593375_080811_kouchner5.jpg

Top Story

DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP/Getty Images

So much for the Olympic truce. As Russian forces pushed into Georgia proper, French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner (right, in Gori) was scrambling to contain a conflict that has entered its fourth day. Georgian soldiers, beating a hasty retreat through the besieged town of Gori, looked in vain for the Western help they had expected.

Top Story

DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP/Getty Images

So much for the Olympic truce. As Russian forces pushed into Georgia proper, French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner (right, in Gori) was scrambling to contain a conflict that has entered its fourth day. Georgian soldiers, beating a hasty retreat through the besieged town of Gori, looked in vain for the Western help they had expected.

Russia continues to reject a cease-fire proposed by Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili, who writes in today’s Wall Street Journal that the war “threatens to undermine the stability of the international security system.”

Meanwhile, the White House has grown increasingly critical of Russia’s “disproportionate response” and has taken a tough line at the United Nations. Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, however, says that the conflict is nearly over. Masha Lippman analyzes Russia’s hoped-for gains.

The BBC has video of a Russian air assault on Gori.

Global Economy

Oil prices are beginning to rise again as the market reacts to the shutdown of Georgian exports. That’s good news for OPEC, which has already earned as much in 2008 as it did in all of 2007.

Americas

Bolivian President Evo Morales is claiming victory in a national referendum on his rule.

Asia

A spokesman for Pervez Musharraf says the Pakistani president won’t resign despite a growing threat of impeachment.

India has won its first individual gold medal.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai called Sunday for military action in Pakistan.

Ousted Thai premier Thaksin Shinawatra has fled to Britain with his wife.

New bombings struck Western China Sunday.

Middle East and Africa

Iraq is seeking a “very clear” withdrawal timeline from the United States.

Iraq’s state sector is expanding rapidly as the private sector fails.

Israel faces a horrible drought.

Europe

Ukraine is showing solidarity with Georgia. Will there be Russian payback?

Decision ’08

Barack Obama’s running mate could be named very soon, the LA Times reports. The name will be announced by e-mail and text message.

John McCain will speak about Georgia this morning at 9 a.m.

Today’s Agenda

Washington will not be removing North Korea from the list of state sponsors of terrorism.

Talks are resuming in Zimbabwe.

U.S. President George W. Bush returns to Washington.

Tag: Russia

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