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ForeignPolicy.com: Chock full o’ new content

The Washington Post‘s Carlos Lozada may have gotten the jump on the new FP cover story (“Think Again: Bush’s Legacy“) about George W. Bush’s presidency by David Frum, but the entire September/October issue is out now and it’s chock full of really great stuff. Top to bottom, it’s a really fantastic issue, but some of ...

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The Washington Post‘s Carlos Lozada may have gotten the jump on the new FP cover story (“Think Again: Bush’s Legacy“) about George W. Bush’s presidency by David Frum, but the entire September/October issue is out now and it’s chock full of really great stuff.

Top to bottom, it’s a really fantastic issue, but some of the main highlights are: “The Secret History of Kim Jong Il,” an inside look at the dark life and times of North Korea’s Dear Leader by his former Russian teacher; “How Economics Can Defeat Corruption,” an innovative look at the scourge of smugglers and other rogues by two extraordinarily creative economists, Raymond Fisman and Edward Miguel; and “The Deadly World of Fake Drugs,” by Roger Bate of the American Enterprise Institute.

We’ve also got an “epiphanies” interview with a pensive Francis Fukuyama, a graphical look at the global trash problem, and, of course, the FP/Center for American Progress 2008 Terrorism Index.

This year’s T-Index, in which we take the pulse of the foreign-policy establishment, reveals a new trend: signs of progress. Unlike the other articles mentioned above, it’s free for non-subscribers, so click away.

And if you aren’t a subscriber to Foreign Policy, what are you waiting for? At just $19.95 per year for six issues, it’s a steal. Subscribe now to get instant online access to these and hundreds of other premium articles in our archives.

The Washington Post‘s Carlos Lozada may have gotten the jump on the new FP cover story (“Think Again: Bush’s Legacy“) about George W. Bush’s presidency by David Frum, but the entire September/October issue is out now and it’s chock full of really great stuff.

Top to bottom, it’s a really fantastic issue, but some of the main highlights are: “The Secret History of Kim Jong Il,” an inside look at the dark life and times of North Korea’s Dear Leader by his former Russian teacher; “How Economics Can Defeat Corruption,” an innovative look at the scourge of smugglers and other rogues by two extraordinarily creative economists, Raymond Fisman and Edward Miguel; and “The Deadly World of Fake Drugs,” by Roger Bate of the American Enterprise Institute.

We’ve also got an “epiphanies” interview with a pensive Francis Fukuyama, a graphical look at the global trash problem, and, of course, the FP/Center for American Progress 2008 Terrorism Index.

This year’s T-Index, in which we take the pulse of the foreign-policy establishment, reveals a new trend: signs of progress. Unlike the other articles mentioned above, it’s free for non-subscribers, so click away.

And if you aren’t a subscriber to Foreign Policy, what are you waiting for? At just $19.95 per year for six issues, it’s a steal. Subscribe now to get instant online access to these and hundreds of other premium articles in our archives.

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