Morning Brief: Meet Michelle Obama

Top Story ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images Would-be First Lady Michelle Obama, headlining the first night of the Democratic National Convention Monday, portrayed her family as the embodiment of the American dream. The speech “sought to humanize a couple that supporters fear may seem distant to many Americans,” according to the Wall Street Journal. “I come here ...

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593009_080826_obama5.jpg

Top Story

ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

Would-be First Lady Michelle Obama, headlining the first night of the Democratic National Convention Monday, portrayed her family as the embodiment of the American dream. The speech "sought to humanize a couple that supporters fear may seem distant to many Americans," according to the Wall Street Journal.

Top Story

ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

Would-be First Lady Michelle Obama, headlining the first night of the Democratic National Convention Monday, portrayed her family as the embodiment of the American dream. The speech “sought to humanize a couple that supporters fear may seem distant to many Americans,” according to the Wall Street Journal.

“I come here as a mom whose girls are the heart of my heart and the center of my world. They’re the first thing I think about when I wake up in the morning, and the last thing I think about when I go to bed at night,” she began. She called upon American voters to listen to “our hopes instead of our fears” and said that her husband would make “an extraordinary president.”

Massachusetts Sen. Ted Kennedy, still struggling to recover from brain cancer, made a surprise appearance in which he declared, “The work begins anew, the hope rises again, and the dream lives on.” (Obama’s speech | Kennedy’s speech)

Decision ’08

Barack Obama is fighting to keep an ad tying him to a 1960s radical off the air.

Authorities in Denver may have uncovered an assassination plot against Obama.

Republicans are trying in various ways to steal a little bit of Obama’s limelight. For instance John McCain appeared on Jay Leno Monday evening, poking some fun at himself.

Global Economy

The dollar is gaining strength against the euro, and crude oil is falling below $114 a barrel.

European and Asian markets fell, while U.S. futures advanced.

Asia

North Korea is causing trouble again. The secretive, Stalinist state is threatening to rebuild its plutonium reprocessing facilities.

Pakistani presidential hopeful Asif Zardari has suffered from mental problems, court records show. And Zalmay Khalilzad, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, is in hot water for unauthorized contacts with Zardari.

Malaysian politician Anwar Ibrahim is likely to win a by-election that will return him to parliament after nearly 10 years.

Thousands of protesters rallied in Thailand to call for the resignation of PM Samak Sundaravej, whom they say is a stand-in for Thaksin Shinawatra.

Middle East and Africa

U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice criticized Israel for building in settlement areas. She met with Israeli PM Ehud Olmert Tuesday.

Two Gulf Arab investors are considering purchasing Hummer from GM.

Europe and the Caucasus


Russian President Dmitry Medvedev decided to recognize South Ossetia and Abkhazia, as the Duma recommended. The Russian stock market fell on the news.

The British government has launched a “secret propaganda war” against al Qaeda, the Guardian reports.

U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney heads to Georgia, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, and Italy next week.

German business confidence is swooning.

Today’s Agenda

Singapore is hosting economic ministers from ASEAN.

Zimbabwe’s new parliament meets for the first time, led by a speaker of parliament from the opposition.

New York Sen. Hillary Clinton speaks tonight at the DNC in Denver.

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