Chinese media savage their Olympic successors

Jeff Gross/Getty Images Boris Johnson may have ruffled some feathers in Beijing by declaring London the “sporting capital of the world” and boasting about Britain inventing ping pong. But the London mayor still had some kind words for China after his Olympic visit. Chinese bloggers and members of the Chinese media, on the other hand, ...

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592939_080827_johnson5.jpg

Jeff Gross/Getty Images

Boris Johnson may have ruffled some feathers in Beijing by declaring London the "sporting capital of the world" and boasting about Britain inventing ping pong. But the London mayor still had some kind words for China after his Olympic visit.

Chinese bloggers and members of the Chinese media, on the other hand, did not take kindly to the performance of Britain -- and Johnson in particular -- during the Olympic changeover ceremony. One blogger blasted Johnson for not buttoning his suit jacket, while another said the mayor appeared "rude and arrogant" while interacting with his counterpart from Beijing. 

Jeff Gross/Getty Images

Boris Johnson may have ruffled some feathers in Beijing by declaring London the “sporting capital of the world” and boasting about Britain inventing ping pong. But the London mayor still had some kind words for China after his Olympic visit.

Chinese bloggers and members of the Chinese media, on the other hand, did not take kindly to the performance of Britain — and Johnson in particular — during the Olympic changeover ceremony. One blogger blasted Johnson for not buttoning his suit jacket, while another said the mayor appeared “rude and arrogant” while interacting with his counterpart from Beijing. 

Some of the harshest words, however, were reserved for Jimmy Page and David Beckham:

Unfortunately, the singer and Jimmy Page are absolutely not famous enough to be known or recognised by millions of the Chinese audiences. As for David Beckham, he was supposed to kick the football towards the red circle in the centre of the Bird’s Nest, in the end, just like any of his penalties at a football match, he totally missed it. 

Ouch. The Brits may not be rallying for Chinese press freedom anytime soon.

Patrick Fitzgerald is a researcher at Foreign Policy.

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