Morning Brief: Mile High Moment

Top Story STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images In front of a crowd of 80,000 at Denver’s Invesco Field, on the 45th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech, Barack Obama accepted the Democratic presidential nomination, becoming the first African-American nominated by either party. “Tears are entirely appropriate,” writes the Washington Post‘s Eugene Robinson. In ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
592912_080829_obama5.jpg
592912_080829_obama5.jpg

Top Story

STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images

In front of a crowd of 80,000 at Denver's Invesco Field, on the 45th anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I have a dream" speech, Barack Obama accepted the Democratic presidential nomination, becoming the first African-American nominated by either party. "Tears are entirely appropriate," writes the Washington Post's Eugene Robinson.

Top Story

STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images

In front of a crowd of 80,000 at Denver’s Invesco Field, on the 45th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech, Barack Obama accepted the Democratic presidential nomination, becoming the first African-American nominated by either party. “Tears are entirely appropriate,” writes the Washington Post‘s Eugene Robinson.

In his nearly 45-minute speech, Obama echoed one of the convention’s recurring themes, saying that a John McCain presidency would represent a continuation of George W. Bush’s “failed” presidency. “It’s not because John McCain doesn’t care,” Obama said. “It’s because John McCain doesn’t get it.”
Pundits noted that the speech contained more specific policy pledges than lofty rhetoric, with Obama promising energy independence within 10 years and a tax cut for the middle class. (It was his “I have a plan” speech, quipped Slate‘s Dahlia Lithwick.)
Liberal pundit Michael Tomasky was impressed that Obama made the speech about the audience rather than himself while conservative Charles Krauthammer predicted that Democrats would wake up this morning wondering “who exactly they married last night.”
McCain ran a magnanimous television ad last night praising his opponent for his historic accomplishment and a “job well done,” though campaign spokesman Tucker Bounds was quick to deride “a misleading speech that was so fundamentally at odds with the meager record of Barack Obama.”
McCain will announce his running mate later today. Minnesota governor Tim Pawlenty says it’s not him.

Europe and the Caucasus

Prime Minister Vladimir Putin accused the U.S. of provoking the South Ossetia war, suggesting a connection to the presidential election. The EU is not planning sanctions against Russia, say French officials.
The U.N. war crimes tribunal at The Hague has entered a not guilty plea for Radovan Karadzic.

Americas

Tropical Storm Gustav pounded Jamaica on its way north toward the Gulf of Mexico. Louisiana and Mississippi are on high alert. Oil producers have halted drilling in the Gulf.
President Evo Morales of Bolivia, a former coca grower, has become an awkward partner in the U.S. war on drugs.

Asia

Thai protesters attacked Bangkok’s police headquarters. Air and rail service have been disrupted throughout the country.
Thirteen have been killed in religious rioting in eastern India while floods have displaced one million in the North. The country’s economy is growing slower than expected.
Japan’s government rolled out a $100 billion economic stimulus package.
Middle East and Africa
Iraqi shiite leader Moqtada al Sadr extended the ceasefire being observed by his Mahdi army.
Iraq signed a $3 billion oil deal with China.
Iran will share nuclear technology with Nigeria.

Today’s Agenda

John McCain is expected to announce his running mate.

Negotiators will meet to attempt to revive power-sharing talks in Zimbabwe.

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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