This Week in China

Top Story Violence continues in Xinjiang province (in pink on the map), where a gang of Uighurs killed two police officers and wounded five others last Wednesday. Police responded by shooting six suspects Saturday. The officers killed Wednesday were also Uighur, underscoring the division in Xinjiang between Uighurs on both sides of the conflict. A ...

592841_080903_xinjiang25.jpg
592841_080903_xinjiang25.jpg

Top Story

Violence continues in Xinjiang province (in pink on the map), where a gang of Uighurs killed two police officers and wounded five others last Wednesday. Police responded by shooting six suspects Saturday.

Top Story

Violence continues in Xinjiang province (in pink on the map), where a gang of Uighurs killed two police officers and wounded five others last Wednesday. Police responded by shooting six suspects Saturday.

The officers killed Wednesday were also Uighur, underscoring the division in Xinjiang between Uighurs on both sides of the conflict. A perceived failure to share the fruits of an oil boom in the region has fueled Uighur resentment toward Beijing, but some have sought employment in security forces or local government.

The death toll in the spate of attacks has reached 39, and the thousands of security troops deployed in Xinjiang to keep peace during the Olympics are not likely to be leaving any time soon.

General

An earthquake in southwestern China killed at least 38 people and downed 180,000 homes Saturday. Officials say it was not an aftershock of the May 12 earthquake in the same region. Premier Wen Jiabao warned of further hardship in Sichuan as winter approaches.

China plans to launch its third manned spacecraft by the end of the month.

Politics

Village laws for the recall of local officals, an experiment in democracy, are proving difficult to enforce.

Police in Beijing have reportedly harassed the 73-year-old mother of an Olympic protestor.

Economy

Iraq’s cabinet approved a $3 billion oil-service deal with the Chinese National Petroleum Company.

Cheap Chinese lanterns are catching on in Egypt during Ramadan, to the dismay of local craftsmen.

Chinese officals say the appreciation of the renmibi does not need to be accelerated, to the dismay of the United States.

A jury in Las Vegas convicted two former Bank of China officials on charges of racketeering and fraud.

Environment

Enjoying blue skies and clear roads, Beijing residents want the emergency pollution measures enacted for the Olypmics to stay for good.

Taiwan

Thousands marched in Taipei Saturday to protest President Ma Ying-jeou’s efforts to improve relations with the mainland.

China Moment

Beijing’s Central Propaganda Department banned criticism of China’s soccer team, which had a disappointing showing during the Olympics.

Patrick Fitzgerald is a researcher at Foreign Policy.

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