John McCain was against Future Combat Systems before he was for criticizing Barack Obama for being against it

As I noted yesterday, the McCain campaign has been dinging Barack Obama for proposing a slowdown in funds for Future Combat Systems, the Army’s $200 billion modernization program. Well, the indefatigable Noah Shachtman has kept digging, and he’s found a doozy. John McCain’s top economic advisor, Douglas Holtz-Eakin, submitted a budget plan to the Washington ...

As I noted yesterday, the McCain campaign has been dinging Barack Obama for proposing a slowdown in funds for Future Combat Systems, the Army's $200 billion modernization program.

Well, the indefatigable Noah Shachtman has kept digging, and he's found a doozy. John McCain's top economic advisor, Douglas Holtz-Eakin, submitted a budget plan to the Washington Post's editorial board in July. In it, the McCain campaign says it will eliminate -- not slow -- FCS entirely:

Balance the budget requires slowing outlay growth to 2.4 percent. The roughly $470 billion dollars (by 2013) in slower spending growth come from reduced deployments abroad ($150 billion; consistent with success in Iraq/Afghanistan that permits deployments to be cut by half -- hopefully more), slower discretionary spending in non-defense and Pentagon procurements ($160 billion; there are lots of procurements -- airborne laser, Globemaster, Future Combat System -- that should be ended and the entire Pentagon budget should be scrubbed).

As I noted yesterday, the McCain campaign has been dinging Barack Obama for proposing a slowdown in funds for Future Combat Systems, the Army’s $200 billion modernization program.

Well, the indefatigable Noah Shachtman has kept digging, and he’s found a doozy. John McCain’s top economic advisor, Douglas Holtz-Eakin, submitted a budget plan to the Washington Post‘s editorial board in July. In it, the McCain campaign says it will eliminate — not slow — FCS entirely:

Balance the budget requires slowing outlay growth to 2.4 percent. The roughly $470 billion dollars (by 2013) in slower spending growth come from reduced deployments abroad ($150 billion; consistent with success in Iraq/Afghanistan that permits deployments to be cut by half — hopefully more), slower discretionary spending in non-defense and Pentagon procurements ($160 billion; there are lots of procurements — airborne laser, Globemaster, Future Combat System — that should be ended and the entire Pentagon budget should be scrubbed).

Whoops. Shactman comments:

McCain aides are privately furious about the contradiction, I’m hearing. But there’s been no official comment, so far, about the mix-up.

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